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Article

The Effect of the COVID-19 Pandemic Movement Restrictions on Self-Reported Physical Activity and Health in New Zealand: A Cross-Sectional Survey

1
Department of Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Auckland, Auckland 1023, New Zealand
2
Movement Physiology Research Laboratory, School of Physiology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2193, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Paul B. Tchounwou and Lynette Hodges
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1719; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041719
Received: 22 December 2020 / Revised: 29 January 2021 / Accepted: 4 February 2021 / Published: 10 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Impact of Clinical Exercise Physiologists on Health and Wellbeing)
This study describes self-reported physical activity (PA), motivation to exercise, physical and mental health and feelings towards PA during the March-May 2020 COVID-19 lockdown in New Zealand. Adults over the age of 18 years (n = 238; 80.2% female) completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), the Behavioural Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire 3, the Short Form-36 and open-ended questions about PA through an anonymous online survey. Regular exercise was undertaken by 85% of respondents prior to lockdown, but only 49.8% were able to maintain their usual level of PA. Although respondents were considered sufficiently physically active from the IPAQ, 51.5% reported not being able to maintain their usual level of PA primarily due to the closure of their gym facilities. Sixty percent of respondents reported that PA had a positive effect on their overall wellbeing. When asked to specify which aspects of wellbeing were affected, the effect on mental health was reported the most while the effect on body image or fitness was reported the least. Strategies to increase or maintain engagement in physical activity during lockdowns should be encouraged to promote positive mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; physical activity; movement restriction; anxiety; mental wellbeing; motivation COVID-19; physical activity; movement restriction; anxiety; mental wellbeing; motivation
MDPI and ACS Style

Meiring, R.M.; Gusso, S.; McCullough, E.; Bradnam, L. The Effect of the COVID-19 Pandemic Movement Restrictions on Self-Reported Physical Activity and Health in New Zealand: A Cross-Sectional Survey. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1719. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041719

AMA Style

Meiring RM, Gusso S, McCullough E, Bradnam L. The Effect of the COVID-19 Pandemic Movement Restrictions on Self-Reported Physical Activity and Health in New Zealand: A Cross-Sectional Survey. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(4):1719. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041719

Chicago/Turabian Style

Meiring, Rebecca M., Silmara Gusso, Eloise McCullough, and Lynley Bradnam. 2021. "The Effect of the COVID-19 Pandemic Movement Restrictions on Self-Reported Physical Activity and Health in New Zealand: A Cross-Sectional Survey" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 4: 1719. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041719

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