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Review

Nuts and Older Adults’ Health: A Narrative Review

1
Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia
2
Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alberto Mantovani
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1848; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041848
Received: 8 January 2021 / Revised: 31 January 2021 / Accepted: 10 February 2021 / Published: 14 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nuts and Human Health)
Although the beneficial effects of nuts on cardiometabolic diseases have been well established, little is known about the effects of nuts on age-related diseases. Given that age-related diseases share many biological pathways with cardiometabolic diseases, it is plausible that diets rich in nuts might be beneficial in ameliorating age-related conditions. The objective of this review was to summarise the findings from studies that have examined the associations or effects of nut consumption, either alone or as part of the dietary pattern, on three major age-related factors—telomere length, sarcopenia, and cognitive function—in older adults. Overall, the currently available evidence suggests that nut consumption, particularly when consumed as part of a healthy diet or over a prolonged period, is associated with positive outcomes such as longer telomere length, reduced risk of sarcopenia, and better cognition in older adults. Future studies that are interventional, long-term, and adequately powered are required to draw definitive conclusions on the effects of nut consumption on age-related diseases, in order to inform dietary recommendations to incorporate nuts into the habitual diet of older adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: nuts; older adults; ageing; quality of life; telomere; sarcopenia; cognition; diet quality nuts; older adults; ageing; quality of life; telomere; sarcopenia; cognition; diet quality
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tan, S.-Y.; Tey, S.L.; Brown, R. Nuts and Older Adults’ Health: A Narrative Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1848. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041848

AMA Style

Tan S-Y, Tey SL, Brown R. Nuts and Older Adults’ Health: A Narrative Review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(4):1848. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041848

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tan, Sze-Yen, Siew L. Tey, and Rachel Brown. 2021. "Nuts and Older Adults’ Health: A Narrative Review" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 4: 1848. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041848

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