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Article

Local-Indigenous Autonomy and Community Streetscape Enhancement: Learnings from Māori and Te Ara Mua—Future Streets Project

1
Ngāti Awa & Ngāti Rangiwewehi, SHORE & Whariki Research Centre, Mackie Research & Massey University, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
2
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
3
Dovetail Consulting Ltd., Auckland 1245, New Zealand
4
Ngāpuhi, DesignTRIBE Architects, Auckland 1021, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Joan Cunningham, Abbey Diaz, Kalinda Griffiths and Lisa Whop
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 865; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18030865
Received: 16 November 2020 / Revised: 25 December 2020 / Accepted: 27 December 2020 / Published: 20 January 2021
In settler countries, attention is now extending to the wellbeing benefits of recognising and promoting the Indigenous cultural identity of neighbourhoods as a contributing factor to more equitable and healthier communities. Re-indigenisation efforts to (re)implement cultural factors into urban design can be challenging and ineffective without the leadership and collaboration of local-Indigenous peoples. Undertaken in Aotearoa New Zealand, Te Ara Mua — Future Street project, demonstrated that co-design has critical potential in the reclamation of Indigenous autonomy, increased local-Indigenous presence and revitalisation of cultural identity. Employing a Kaupapa Māori (Māori-centred) research approach, we focused on the workings and perspectives of mana whenua (local-Indigenous peoples) and community stakeholder engagement in Te Ara Mua. An Indigenous theoretical framework, Te Pae Mahutonga, was utilised in the data analysis to explore perspectives of Indigenous collective agency, empowerment, and wellbeing. Our research demonstrates that developing capacity amongst Indigenous communities is integral for effective engagement and that the realisation of autonomy in urban design projects has broader implications for Indigenous sovereignty, spatial justice and health equity. Significantly, we argue that future community enhancement strategies must include not only re-designing and re-imagining initiatives, but also re-indigenising. View Full-Text
Keywords: Indigenous; co-design; streetscapes; re-indigenisation; indigenous autonomy; Māori Indigenous; co-design; streetscapes; re-indigenisation; indigenous autonomy; Māori
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MDPI and ACS Style

Raerino, K.; Macmillan, A.; Field, A.; Hoskins, R. Local-Indigenous Autonomy and Community Streetscape Enhancement: Learnings from Māori and Te Ara Mua—Future Streets Project. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 865. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18030865

AMA Style

Raerino K, Macmillan A, Field A, Hoskins R. Local-Indigenous Autonomy and Community Streetscape Enhancement: Learnings from Māori and Te Ara Mua—Future Streets Project. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(3):865. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18030865

Chicago/Turabian Style

Raerino, Kimiora, Alex Macmillan, Adrian Field, and Rau Hoskins. 2021. "Local-Indigenous Autonomy and Community Streetscape Enhancement: Learnings from Māori and Te Ara Mua—Future Streets Project" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 3: 865. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18030865

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