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Article

Applying Spatial Video Geonarratives and Physiological Measurements to Explore Perceived Safety in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

1
Boston Area Research Initiative, School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2
Department of Geography and Anthropology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
3
Department of Geoinformatics, University of Salzburg, 5020 Salzburg, Austria
4
Center for Geographic Analysis, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
5
Spatial Information Management, Carinthia University of Applied Sciences, 9524 Villach, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Minou Weijs-Perrée
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1284; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031284
Received: 29 November 2020 / Revised: 23 January 2021 / Accepted: 25 January 2021 / Published: 31 January 2021
Spatial crime analysis, together with perceived (crime) safety analysis have tremendously benefitted from Geographic Information Science (GISc) and the application of geospatial technology. This research study discusses a novel methodological approach to document the use of emerging geospatial technologies to explore perceived urban safety from the lenses of fear of crime or crime perception in the city of Baton Rouge, USA. The mixed techniques include a survey, spatial video geonarrative (SVG) in the field with study participants, and the extraction of moments of stress (MOS) from biosensing wristbands. This study enrolled 46 participants who completed geonarratives and MOS detection. A subset of 10 of these geonarratives are presented here. Each participant was driven in a car equipped with audio recording and spatial video along a predefined route while wearing the Empatica E4 wristbands to measure three physiological variables, all of them linked by timestamp. The results show differences in the participants’ sentiments (positive or negative) and MOS in the field based on gender. These mixed-methods are encouraging for finding relationships between actual crime occurrences and the community perceived fear of crime in urban areas. View Full-Text
Keywords: perceived safety; spatial video; geonarrative; moments of stress; mixed-method approach; wearable sensors; spatiotemporal semantic analysis; sentiment analysis perceived safety; spatial video; geonarrative; moments of stress; mixed-method approach; wearable sensors; spatiotemporal semantic analysis; sentiment analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ristea, A.; Leitner, M.; Resch, B.; Stratmann, J. Applying Spatial Video Geonarratives and Physiological Measurements to Explore Perceived Safety in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1284. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031284

AMA Style

Ristea A, Leitner M, Resch B, Stratmann J. Applying Spatial Video Geonarratives and Physiological Measurements to Explore Perceived Safety in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(3):1284. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031284

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ristea, Alina, Michael Leitner, Bernd Resch, and Judith Stratmann. 2021. "Applying Spatial Video Geonarratives and Physiological Measurements to Explore Perceived Safety in Baton Rouge, Louisiana" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 3: 1284. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031284

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