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Article

Predictors of Adherence to Smoking Cessation Medications among Current and Ex-Smokers in Australia: Findings from a National Cross-Sectional Survey

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School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
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Hunter Medical Research Institute, Lot 1, Kookaburra Circuit, New Lambton Heights, NSW 2305, Australia
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Faculty of Health, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, NSW 2450, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(22), 12225; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182212225
Received: 19 October 2021 / Revised: 11 November 2021 / Accepted: 19 November 2021 / Published: 21 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Public Health Statistics and Risk Assessment)
Background: Adherence to smoking cessation medications (SCMs) improve the rate of successful quitting. This study aimed to evaluate the level of adherence to SCMs and associated factors among smokers and ex-smokers in Australia. Method: A cross-sectional study using an online survey was conducted in Australia. Descriptive statistics were used to present the overall characteristics of participants. Cross-tabulation with Pearson’s chi-square test was performed to evaluate the possible associations between factors. To explore barriers and facilitators of adherence to SCMs, logistic regressions were conducted. Results: Among 201 participants, 57 (28.4%) were found to be adherent to SCMs. The odds of being adherent were found to be higher among participants with good social support (AOR = 3.28, 95% CI of 2.30–6.27). Participants who did not experience anxiety symptoms had higher odds of being adherent to SCMs as compared to smokers who had anxiety symptoms (AOR = 4.41, 95% CI of 3.64–14.68). Having previous experience of using SCMs improved adherence four-fold (AOR = 3.87, 95% CI of 1.11–13.44). Level of nicotine dependence showed a direct association with adherence (AOR = 3.53, 95% CI of 1.40–8.95). Not relapsing while on the medications improved adherence (AOR = 2.88, 95% CI of 1.21–6.88). Conclusion: In a study of smokers and ex-smokers in Australia, the self-reported level of adherence to SCMs was found to be low. Adherence was associated with social, psychological, and medication-related factors. Smoking cessation interventions are recommended to include strategies that can address medication adherence. View Full-Text
Keywords: adherence; cigarette; quitting; smoking; smoking cessation medications adherence; cigarette; quitting; smoking; smoking cessation medications
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mersha, A.G.; Kennedy, M.; Eftekhari, P.; Gould, G.S. Predictors of Adherence to Smoking Cessation Medications among Current and Ex-Smokers in Australia: Findings from a National Cross-Sectional Survey. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 12225. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182212225

AMA Style

Mersha AG, Kennedy M, Eftekhari P, Gould GS. Predictors of Adherence to Smoking Cessation Medications among Current and Ex-Smokers in Australia: Findings from a National Cross-Sectional Survey. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(22):12225. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182212225

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mersha, Amanual G., Michelle Kennedy, Parivash Eftekhari, and Gillian S. Gould. 2021. "Predictors of Adherence to Smoking Cessation Medications among Current and Ex-Smokers in Australia: Findings from a National Cross-Sectional Survey" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 22: 12225. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182212225

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