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Article

Not All Remote Workers Are Similar: Technology Acceptance, Remote Work Beliefs, and Wellbeing of Remote Workers during the Second Wave of the COVID-19 Pandemic

1
Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, 47521 Cesena, Italy
2
Department of Psychology and Human Capital Development, Financial University under the Government of the Russian Federation, 125993 Moscow, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Monica Molino, Claudio Giovanni Cortese and Chiara Ghislieri
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(22), 12095; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182212095
Received: 30 October 2021 / Revised: 13 November 2021 / Accepted: 16 November 2021 / Published: 18 November 2021
Although a large part of the world’s workforce engaged in mandatory Work from Home during the COVID-19 pandemic, the experience was not the same for everyone. This study explores whether different groups of employees, based on their work and organizational characteristics (i.e., organizational size, number of days per week working from home, working in team) and personal characteristics (i.e., remote work experience, having children at home), express different beliefs about working remotely, acceptance of the technology necessary to Work from Home, and well-being. A study was conducted with 163 Italian workers who answered an online questionnaire from November 2020 to January 2021. A cluster analysis revealed that work, organizational, and personal variables distinguish five different types of workers. ANOVA statistics showed that remote workers from big companies who worked remotely several days a week, had experience (because they worked remotely before the national lockdowns), and worked in a team, had more positive beliefs about working remotely, higher technology acceptance, and better coping strategies, compared to the other groups of workers. Practical implications to support institutional and organizational decision-makers and HR managers to promote remote work and employee well-being are presented. View Full-Text
Keywords: remote working; Technology Acceptance Model (TAM); Work from Home (WFH); well-being; coping remote working; Technology Acceptance Model (TAM); Work from Home (WFH); well-being; coping
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MDPI and ACS Style

Donati, S.; Viola, G.; Toscano, F.; Zappalà, S. Not All Remote Workers Are Similar: Technology Acceptance, Remote Work Beliefs, and Wellbeing of Remote Workers during the Second Wave of the COVID-19 Pandemic. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 12095. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182212095

AMA Style

Donati S, Viola G, Toscano F, Zappalà S. Not All Remote Workers Are Similar: Technology Acceptance, Remote Work Beliefs, and Wellbeing of Remote Workers during the Second Wave of the COVID-19 Pandemic. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(22):12095. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182212095

Chicago/Turabian Style

Donati, Simone, Gianluca Viola, Ferdinando Toscano, and Salvatore Zappalà. 2021. "Not All Remote Workers Are Similar: Technology Acceptance, Remote Work Beliefs, and Wellbeing of Remote Workers during the Second Wave of the COVID-19 Pandemic" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 22: 12095. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182212095

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