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Article

Capillaroscopic Evidence of Microvascular Damage in Volleyball Players

1
Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L’Aquila, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy
2
Allergy and Clinical Immunology Unit, Center for the diagnosis and treatment of Osteoporosis, AUSL 04 Teramo, 64100 Teramo, Italy
3
Department of Human Neurosciences Sapienza, University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy
4
IRCCS Neuromed, 86077 Pozzilli, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Olga Scudiero and Giulia Frisso
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(20), 10601; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010601
Received: 27 July 2021 / Revised: 5 October 2021 / Accepted: 7 October 2021 / Published: 10 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity Related Disorders)
Volleyball players experience repetitive stress that involves their hands and, in particular, their fingers. Literature reports that repetitive trauma can lead to local vascular abnormalities, such as reduced capillarization and lower resting blood flow. These anomalies could be related to the presence of dysfunctional endothelium. The aim of this study is to correlate the capillaroscopic findings by nailfold video capillaroscopy (NVC) to volleyball practice in order to early detect possible anomalies and perform an adequate follow-up to avoid damages that could negatively affect sport practice and the players’ health status. In this study, 38 subjects were enrolled, 19 volleyball players and 19 healthy non-players as a comparison group. In almost all the players, we found capillaroscopic alterations of the “aspecific pattern” type without substantial gender differences. We may assume that the repeated traumas involving players’ fingers can negatively modify their microcirculation. Based on these observations, it could be a desirable clinical practice to screen professional volleyball players with NVC in order to implement preventive strategies aimed at protecting the health of athletes. View Full-Text
Keywords: volleyball; volleyball player; Raynaud’s phenomenon; microvascular dysfunction; microcirculation; nailfold video capillaroscopy; endothelial dysfunction volleyball; volleyball player; Raynaud’s phenomenon; microvascular dysfunction; microcirculation; nailfold video capillaroscopy; endothelial dysfunction
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sirufo, M.M.; Catalogna, A.; Raggiunti, M.; De Pietro, F.; Galeoto, G.; Bassino, E.M.; Ginaldi, L.; De Martinis, M. Capillaroscopic Evidence of Microvascular Damage in Volleyball Players. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 10601. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010601

AMA Style

Sirufo MM, Catalogna A, Raggiunti M, De Pietro F, Galeoto G, Bassino EM, Ginaldi L, De Martinis M. Capillaroscopic Evidence of Microvascular Damage in Volleyball Players. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(20):10601. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010601

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sirufo, Maria M., Alessandra Catalogna, Martina Raggiunti, Francesca De Pietro, Giovanni Galeoto, Enrica M. Bassino, Lia Ginaldi, and Massimo De Martinis. 2021. "Capillaroscopic Evidence of Microvascular Damage in Volleyball Players" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 20: 10601. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010601

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