Next Article in Journal
Traditional Gender Differences Create Gaps in the Effect of COVID-19 on Psychological Distress of Japanese Workers
Next Article in Special Issue
Data-Powered Positive Deviance during the SARS-CoV-2 Pandemic—An Ecological Pilot Study of German Districts
Previous Article in Journal
The Potential Role of Hamstring Extensibility on Sagittal Pelvic Tilt, Sagittal Spinal Curves and Recurrent Low Back Pain in Team Sports Players: A Gender Perspective Analysis
Previous Article in Special Issue
Investigation of Four Clusters of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in Rwanda, 2020
Article

Enhancing Teaching Recovery Techniques (TRT) with Parenting Skills: RCT of TRT + Parenting with Trauma-Affected Syrian Refugees in Lebanon Utilising Remote Training with Implications for Insecure Contexts and COVID-19

1
Prevention, Treatment and Rehabilitation Section, Drug Prevention and Health Branch, Division of Operations, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1400 Vienna, Austria
2
Division of Psychology & Mental Health, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9WL, UK
3
Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, Complex Trauma and Resilience Research Unit, Research and Innovation Office, Manchester M13 9WL, UK
4
Global Mental Health and Cultural Psychiatry Research Group, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
5
Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester M23 9LT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
The views expressed in this Article do not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations (UN) or its officials or Member States.
Academic Editors: Estefanía Estévez and Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8652; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168652
Received: 1 July 2021 / Revised: 11 August 2021 / Accepted: 12 August 2021 / Published: 16 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ensure Healthy Lives and Promote Wellbeing for All at All Ages)
Child psychosocial recovery interventions in humanitarian contexts often overlook the significant effect that caregivers can have on improving children’s future trajectory. We enhanced the well-established, evidenced-based child trauma recovery programme Teaching Recovery Techniques (TRT) intervention with parenting sessions, i.e., TRT + Parenting (TRT + P), which aims to improve parent mental health and their ability to support their children’s mental health. We describe the findings of a three-arm randomised controlled trial comparing enhanced TRT + P vs. TRT and waitlist. The primary aim was to test if children in the enhanced arm of the programme show improved child and caregiver mental health. We recruited 119 Syrian refugee children and one of their caregivers in Beqaa Valley in Lebanon. They were randomised to the TRT, TRT + P, or waitlist control group. Data were collected at baseline and 2 weeks and 12 weeks post intervention. Training of facilitators was via remote training from the United Kingdom. Results showed a highly consistent pattern, with children in the enhanced TRT + P group showing the greatest levels of improvement in behavioural and emotional difficulties compared to children in the TRT or waitlist control groups. Caregivers in the TRT + P group also reported significant reductions in depression, anxiety, and stress. Findings indicate that the addition of the evidence-based parenting skills components has the potential to enhance the effects of interventions designed to improve children’s mental health in contexts of trauma, conflict, and displacement. Implications for COVID-19 remote learning are also discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: refugee; family skills; parenting; displaced population; war; conflict refugee; family skills; parenting; displaced population; war; conflict
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

El-Khani, A.; Cartwright, K.; Maalouf, W.; Haar, K.; Zehra, N.; Çokamay-Yılmaz, G.; Calam, R. Enhancing Teaching Recovery Techniques (TRT) with Parenting Skills: RCT of TRT + Parenting with Trauma-Affected Syrian Refugees in Lebanon Utilising Remote Training with Implications for Insecure Contexts and COVID-19. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 8652. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168652

AMA Style

El-Khani A, Cartwright K, Maalouf W, Haar K, Zehra N, Çokamay-Yılmaz G, Calam R. Enhancing Teaching Recovery Techniques (TRT) with Parenting Skills: RCT of TRT + Parenting with Trauma-Affected Syrian Refugees in Lebanon Utilising Remote Training with Implications for Insecure Contexts and COVID-19. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(16):8652. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168652

Chicago/Turabian Style

El-Khani, Aala, Kim Cartwright, Wadih Maalouf, Karin Haar, Nosheen Zehra, Gökçe Çokamay-Yılmaz, and Rachel Calam. 2021. "Enhancing Teaching Recovery Techniques (TRT) with Parenting Skills: RCT of TRT + Parenting with Trauma-Affected Syrian Refugees in Lebanon Utilising Remote Training with Implications for Insecure Contexts and COVID-19" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 16: 8652. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168652

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop