Next Article in Journal
Effects of Olympic Combat Sports on Older Adults’ Health Status: A Systematic Review
Previous Article in Journal
Trunk Posture during Manual Materials Handling of Beer Kegs
 
 
Review

Ultra-Processed Food Availability and Noncommunicable Diseases: A Systematic Review

1
Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Porto, 4150-180 Porto, Portugal
2
Public Health Institute, University of Porto, 4050-091 Porto, Portugal
3
Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, 4200-319 Porto, Portugal
4
Center for Health Technology and Services Research, University of Porto, 4200-450 Porto, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Mary Anne Amalaradjou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7382; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147382
Received: 13 May 2021 / Revised: 7 July 2021 / Accepted: 8 July 2021 / Published: 10 July 2021
Ultra-processed food (UPF) can be harmful to the population’s health. To establish associations between UPF and health outcomes, food consumption can be assessed using availability data, such as purchase lists or household budget surveys. The aim of this systematic review was to search studies that related UPF availability with noncommunicable diseases or their risk factors. PRISMA guidelines were used. Searches were performed in PubMed, EBSCO, Scopus and Web of Science in February 2021. The search strategy included terms related to exposure (UPF) and outcomes (noncommunicable diseases and their risk factors). Studies that assessed only food consumption at an individual level and did not present health outcomes were excluded. Two reviewers conducted the selection process, and a third helped when disagreement occurred. The Newcastle–Ottawa Scale was used to assess the studies’ quality; 998 records were analyzed. All 11 eligible studies were ecological and assessed overweight and obesity as a health outcome, only one showed no positive association with UPF availability. Two studies included the prevalence of diabetes as an outcome, however no significant association was found with UPF availability. Studies relating UPF availability and health outcomes are focused on overweight and obesity. It is necessary to further explore the relationship between other health outcomes and UPF availability using purchase or sales data. View Full-Text
Keywords: food processing; households; noncommunicable diseases; systematic review; ultra-processed food food processing; households; noncommunicable diseases; systematic review; ultra-processed food
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

de Araújo, T.P.; de Moraes, M.M.; Magalhães, V.; Afonso, C.; Santos, C.; Rodrigues, S.S.P. Ultra-Processed Food Availability and Noncommunicable Diseases: A Systematic Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7382. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147382

AMA Style

de Araújo TP, de Moraes MM, Magalhães V, Afonso C, Santos C, Rodrigues SSP. Ultra-Processed Food Availability and Noncommunicable Diseases: A Systematic Review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(14):7382. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147382

Chicago/Turabian Style

de Araújo, Taissa Pereira, Milena M. de Moraes, Vânia Magalhães, Cláudia Afonso, Cristina Santos, and Sara S. P. Rodrigues. 2021. "Ultra-Processed Food Availability and Noncommunicable Diseases: A Systematic Review" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 14: 7382. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147382

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop