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Article

Remote Work, Work Stress, and Work–Life during Pandemic Times: A Latin America Situation

1
Facultad de Psicología, Universidad de La Sabana, Chía 250001, Colombia
2
INALDE Business School, Universidad de La Sabana, Chía 250001, Colombia
3
Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá 111321, Colombia
4
Universidad Espíritu Santo, Samborondon 104135, Ecuador
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Carlos Ruiz-Frutos, Sarah A. Felknor and Juan Gómez-Salgado
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 7069; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18137069
Received: 26 May 2021 / Revised: 27 June 2021 / Accepted: 29 June 2021 / Published: 2 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prevention of Occupational Risks)
The COVID-19 pandemic affected the relationship between work and life almost everywhere on the planet. Suddenly, remote work became the mainstream way of working for millions of workers. In this context, we explore how the relationship between remote work, work stress, and work–life developed during pandemic times in a Latin America context. In a sample of 1285 responses collected between April and May 2020, through a PLS-SEM model, we found that remote work in pandemic times increased perceived stress (β = 0.269; p < 0.01), reduced work–life balance (β = −0.225; p < 0.01) and work satisfaction (β = −0.190; p < 0.01), and increased productivity (β = 0.120; p < 0.01) and engagement (β = 0.120; p < 0.01). We also found a partial moderating effect, competitive and complementary, of perceived stress, and one significant gender difference: when working remotely, perceived stress affects men’s productivity more acutely than women’s productivity. View Full-Text
Keywords: remote work; perceived stress; work–life; COVID-19; Latin America remote work; perceived stress; work–life; COVID-19; Latin America
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sandoval-Reyes, J.; Idrovo-Carlier, S.; Duque-Oliva, E.J. Remote Work, Work Stress, and Work–Life during Pandemic Times: A Latin America Situation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7069. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18137069

AMA Style

Sandoval-Reyes J, Idrovo-Carlier S, Duque-Oliva EJ. Remote Work, Work Stress, and Work–Life during Pandemic Times: A Latin America Situation. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(13):7069. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18137069

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sandoval-Reyes, Juan, Sandra Idrovo-Carlier, and Edison Jair Duque-Oliva. 2021. "Remote Work, Work Stress, and Work–Life during Pandemic Times: A Latin America Situation" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 13: 7069. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18137069

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