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Article

A Comparison of the Gluco-Regulatory Responses to High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Resistance Exercise

1
Holsworth Research Initiative, La Trobe Rural Health School, La Trobe University, Bendigo, VIC 3550, Australia
2
Department of Physiology, Anatomy & Microbiology, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC 3086, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 287; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010287
Received: 30 October 2020 / Revised: 28 December 2020 / Accepted: 29 December 2020 / Published: 2 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Prescription of Exercise to Improve Cardiovascular Health)
High-intensity interval exercise and resistance exercise both effectively lower blood glucose; however, it is not clear whether different regulatory mechanisms exist. This randomised cross-over study compared the acute gluco-regulatory and the physiological responses of high-intensity interval exercise and resistance exercise. Sixteen (eight males and eight females) recreationally active individuals, aged (mean ± SD) 22 ± 7 years, participated with a seven-day period between interventions. The high-intensity interval exercise trial consisted of twelve, 30 s cycling intervals at 80% of peak power capacity and 90 s active recovery. The resistance exercise trial consisted of four sets of 10 repetitions for three lower-limb exercises at 80% 1-RM, matched for duration of high-intensity interval exercise. Exercise was performed after an overnight fast, with blood samples collected every 30 min, for two hours after exercise. There was a significant interaction between time and intervention for glucose (p = 0.02), which was, on average (mean ± SD), 0.7 ± 0.7 mmol∙L−1 higher following high-intensity interval exercise, as compared to resistance exercise. Cortisol concentration over time was affected by intervention (p = 0.03), with cortisol 70 ± 103 ng∙mL−1 higher (p = 0.015), on average, following high-intensity interval exercise. Resistance exercise did not induce the acute rise in glucose that was induced by high-intensity interval exercise and appears to be an appropriate alternative to positively regulate blood glucose. View Full-Text
Keywords: resistance training; high-intensity interval training; metabolism; insulin; stress; exercise resistance training; high-intensity interval training; metabolism; insulin; stress; exercise
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gordon, B.A.; Taylor, C.J.; Church, J.E.; Cousins, S.D. A Comparison of the Gluco-Regulatory Responses to High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Resistance Exercise. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 287. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010287

AMA Style

Gordon BA, Taylor CJ, Church JE, Cousins SD. A Comparison of the Gluco-Regulatory Responses to High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Resistance Exercise. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(1):287. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010287

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gordon, Brett A., Caroline J. Taylor, Jarrod E. Church, and Stephen D. Cousins 2021. "A Comparison of the Gluco-Regulatory Responses to High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Resistance Exercise" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 1: 287. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010287

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