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Open AccessArticle

Opening a Large Delivery Service Warehouse in the South Bronx: Impacts on Traffic, Air Pollution, and Noise

1
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
2
South Bronx Unite (Co-Founder), New York, NY 10454, USA
3
Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
4
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3208; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093208
Received: 20 March 2020 / Revised: 21 April 2020 / Accepted: 27 April 2020 / Published: 5 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air Pollution Exposure and Health of Vulnerable Groups)
Mott Haven, a low-income neighborhood in New York City, suffers from increased air pollution and accommodates several industrial facilities and interstates. In 2018, a large delivery service warehouse opened. Our objectives are to characterize black carbon (BC), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), and noise in the community; model changes in traffic due to the facility opening; and estimate associated BC and noise changes. BC, PM2.5, and noise were measured at eight sites pre-opening, and traffic counted continuously at two sites (June 2017–May 2019). An interrupted time series model was used to determine facility-related changes in traffic. Post-opening changes in traffic-related BC/noise were estimated from regressions of BC/noise with traffic flow. Mean (SD) pre-warehouse measures of BC and PM2.5 were 1.33 µg/m3 (0.41) and 7.88 µg/m3 (1.24), respectively. At four sites, equivalent sound levels exceeded the EPA’s recommended 70 dBA limit. After the warehouse opening, traffic increased significantly, predominantly at night. At one site, the greatest change for trucks occurred 9PM-12AM: 31.7% (95%CI [23.4%, 40.6%]). Increased traffic translated into mean predicted increases of 0.003 µg/m3 (BC) and 0.06 dBA (noise). Though small, they negate the substantial decrease the community seeks. Our findings can help communities and policymakers better understand impacts of traffic-intensive facilities. View Full-Text
Keywords: traffic related air pollution; traffic flow; black carbon; noise; environmental justice; natural experiment traffic related air pollution; traffic flow; black carbon; noise; environmental justice; natural experiment
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Shearston, J.A.; Johnson, A.M.; Domingo-Relloso, A.; Kioumourtzoglou, M.-A.; Hernández, D.; Ross, J.; Chillrud, S.N.; Hilpert, M. Opening a Large Delivery Service Warehouse in the South Bronx: Impacts on Traffic, Air Pollution, and Noise. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3208.

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