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Open AccessReview

Impact of Environmental Injustice on Children’s Health—Interaction between Air Pollution and Socioeconomic Status

1
Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
2
Gangarosa Department of Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 795; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020795
Received: 7 December 2020 / Revised: 14 January 2021 / Accepted: 15 January 2021 / Published: 19 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air Pollution Exposure and Health of Vulnerable Groups)
Air pollution disproportionately affects marginalized populations of lower socioeconomic status. There is little literature on how socioeconomic status affects the risk of exposure to air pollution and associated health outcomes, particularly for children’s health. The objective of this article was to review the existing literature on air pollution and children’s health and discern how socioeconomic status affects this association. The concept of environmental injustice recognizes how underserved communities often suffer from higher air pollution concentrations in addition to other underlying risk factors for impaired health. This exposure then exerts larger effects on their health than it does in the average population, affecting the whole body, including the lungs and the brain. Children, whose organs and mind are still developing and who do not have the means of protecting themselves or creating change, are the most vulnerable to the detrimental effects of air pollution and environmental injustice. The adverse health effects of air pollution and environmental injustice can harm children well into adulthood and may even have transgenerational effects. There is an urgent need for action in order to ensure the health and safety of future generations, as social disparities are continuously increasing, due to social discrimination and climate change. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental injustice; children; respiratory health; cognitive development; air pollution; socioeconomic status environmental injustice; children; respiratory health; cognitive development; air pollution; socioeconomic status
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mathiarasan, S.; Hüls, A. Impact of Environmental Injustice on Children’s Health—Interaction between Air Pollution and Socioeconomic Status. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 795. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020795

AMA Style

Mathiarasan S, Hüls A. Impact of Environmental Injustice on Children’s Health—Interaction between Air Pollution and Socioeconomic Status. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(2):795. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020795

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mathiarasan, Sahana; Hüls, Anke. 2021. "Impact of Environmental Injustice on Children’s Health—Interaction between Air Pollution and Socioeconomic Status" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 2: 795. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020795

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