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The Joint Effects of Some Beverages Intake and Smoking on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Korean Adults: Data Analysis of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), 2008–2015

1
School of Health and Environmental Science, Korea University, 145 Anam-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Korea
2
Department of Health Science, Korea University, 145 Anam-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2611; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072611
Received: 27 February 2020 / Revised: 8 April 2020 / Accepted: 9 April 2020 / Published: 10 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Public Health Statistics and Risk Assessment)
Some beverages and smoking cause an inflammatory response in the lungs and airways in a similar way, ultimately affecting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) occurrence. Using a nationally representative health survey database, this study investigates the individual and joint effects of consumption of different beverages and smoking on COPD. This study is a cross-sectional analysis of 15,961 Korean adults in the Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey of 2008–2015. COPD was defined as forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) divided by forced vital capacity (FVC) <0.70. We used multiple linear and logistic regression models to examine the association of beverage consumption and smoking with an FEV1/FVC ratio and odds ratio (OR) for COPD. The mean FEV1/FVC ratio decreased with increasing soda intake (p = 0.016), coffee intake (p = 0.031), and smoking status; however, the mean FEV1/FVC ratio increased with increasing green tea intake frequency (p = 0.029). When soda intake increased to 10 times/month, the OR of having COPD increased to 1.04 times (95% CI: 1.01, 1.07). The positive joint effect of soda intake and smoking on COPD was marginally significant (p = 0.058). We found that soda intake, coffee intake, and smoking increased airflow limitation while green tea intake decreased it. In addition, soda intake and smoking had a positive joint effect on COPD in the Korean population. View Full-Text
Keywords: soda; coffee; green tea; smoking; lung function; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; interaction; Korean adults soda; coffee; green tea; smoking; lung function; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; interaction; Korean adults
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MDPI and ACS Style

Min, J.E.; Huh, D.-A.; Moon, K.W. The Joint Effects of Some Beverages Intake and Smoking on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Korean Adults: Data Analysis of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), 2008–2015. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2611. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072611

AMA Style

Min JE, Huh D-A, Moon KW. The Joint Effects of Some Beverages Intake and Smoking on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Korean Adults: Data Analysis of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), 2008–2015. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(7):2611. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072611

Chicago/Turabian Style

Min, Ji E., Da-An Huh, and Kyong W. Moon 2020. "The Joint Effects of Some Beverages Intake and Smoking on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Korean Adults: Data Analysis of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), 2008–2015" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 7: 2611. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072611

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