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Open AccessArticle

Acute Mental Health Needs Duration during Major Disasters: A Phenomenological Experience of Disaster Psychiatric Assistance Teams (DPATs) in Japan

1
Department of Disaster and Community Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba; Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577, Japan
2
Department of Community and Disaster Assistance, Ibaraki Prefectural Medical Center of Psychiatry, Asahi-machi, Kasama, Ibaraki 309-1717, Japan
3
Nihon Fukushi University, Okuda, Mihama-cho, Chita-gun, Aichi 470-3295, Japan
4
DPAT secretariat, commissioned by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, Kasumigaseki Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8916, Japan
5
Kanagawa Psychiatric Center, Serigaya, Konan Ward, Yokohama, Kanagawa 233-0006, Japan
6
Department of Psychiatry, Division of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1530; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051530
Received: 25 December 2019 / Revised: 22 February 2020 / Accepted: 24 February 2020 / Published: 27 February 2020
Background: How long acute mental health needs continue after the disaster are problems which must be addressed in the treatment of victims. The aim of this study is to determine victims’ needs by examining activity data from Disaster Psychiatric Assistance Teams (DPATs) in Japan. Methods: Data from four disasters were extracted from the disaster mental health information support system (DMHISS) database, and the transition of the number of consultations and the activity period were examined. Results: Common to all four disasters, the number of consultations increased rapidly from 0–2 days, reaching a peak within about a week. The partial correlation coefficient between the number of days of activity and the maximum number of victims showed significance. The number of victims and days of activity can be used to obtain a regression curve. Conclusions: This is the first report to reveal that mental health needs are the greatest in the hyper-acute stage, and the need for consultation and the duration of needs depends on the number of victims. View Full-Text
Keywords: disaster; Kumamoto earthquake; DMHISS; disaster psychiatry; Japan; acute mental health needs; duration of activity; DPAT (Disaster Psychiatric Assistance Team) disaster; Kumamoto earthquake; DMHISS; disaster psychiatry; Japan; acute mental health needs; duration of activity; DPAT (Disaster Psychiatric Assistance Team)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Takahashi, S.; Takagi, Y.; Fukuo, Y.; Arai, T.; Watari, M.; Tachikawa, H. Acute Mental Health Needs Duration during Major Disasters: A Phenomenological Experience of Disaster Psychiatric Assistance Teams (DPATs) in Japan. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1530.

AMA Style

Takahashi S, Takagi Y, Fukuo Y, Arai T, Watari M, Tachikawa H. Acute Mental Health Needs Duration during Major Disasters: A Phenomenological Experience of Disaster Psychiatric Assistance Teams (DPATs) in Japan. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(5):1530.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Takahashi, Sho; Takagi, Yoshifumi; Fukuo, Yasuhisa; Arai, Tetsuaki; Watari, Michiko; Tachikawa, Hirokazu. 2020. "Acute Mental Health Needs Duration during Major Disasters: A Phenomenological Experience of Disaster Psychiatric Assistance Teams (DPATs) in Japan" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 5: 1530.

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