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Open AccessArticle

Energy Drink Consumption, Depression, and Salutogenic Sense of Coherence Among Adolescents and Young Adults

1
Institute of Sport Sciences and Physical Education, Faculty of Science, University of Pécs, H-7624 Pécs, Hungary
2
Doctoral School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pécs, H-7621 Pécs, Hungary
3
Institute of English Studies, University of Pécs, H-7624 Pécs, Hungary
4
Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pécs, H-7623 Pécs, Hungary
5
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pécs, H-7623 Pécs, Hungary
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1290; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041290
Received: 26 December 2019 / Revised: 1 February 2020 / Accepted: 14 February 2020 / Published: 17 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth and Social Deviance)
The prevalence of energy drink consumption has increased in Hungary over the past 10–15 years. This study assesses the frequency, motivations, and adverse effects of energy drink consumption, and examines how the process of becoming a regular consumer is connected with sense of coherence and depression symptoms. A total of 631 high school and college students were assessed using the Depression Scale (BDS-13) and Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC-13). Logistic regression models were fit to test the effect of and links between factors influencing addiction to energy drink use. A total of 31.1% (95% CI: 27.4–34.7) of those surveyed consumed energy drinks, 24.0% of those affected consumed the energy drink with alcohol, 71.4% (95% CI: 64.7–77.3) experienced adverse effects following energy drink consumption, and 10.2% (95% CI: 6.7–15.2) experienced at least four symptoms simultaneously. The most common motivations of consumption were fatigue, taste, and fun. Obtained by multivariate logistic regression models, after adjustment for sex and age, SOC and tendency to depression had a significant influence on the respondents’ odds of addiction. The tendency to depression increases the chances of addiction, while a strong sense of coherence diminishes the effects of depression. Young people in Hungary have been shown to consume energy drinks in quantities that are detrimental to their health. Complex preventive measures and programs are needed to address the problem. Families and educators should strive to instill a strong sense of coherence in children from an early age. View Full-Text
Keywords: energy drinks; adolescents; young adults; sense of coherence; depression energy drinks; adolescents; young adults; sense of coherence; depression
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tóth, Á.; Soós, R.; Szovák, E.; M. Najbauer, N.; Tényi, D.; Csábí, G.; Wilhelm, M. Energy Drink Consumption, Depression, and Salutogenic Sense of Coherence Among Adolescents and Young Adults. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1290. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041290

AMA Style

Tóth Á, Soós R, Szovák E, M. Najbauer N, Tényi D, Csábí G, Wilhelm M. Energy Drink Consumption, Depression, and Salutogenic Sense of Coherence Among Adolescents and Young Adults. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(4):1290. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041290

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tóth, Ákos; Soós, Rita; Szovák, Etelka; M. Najbauer, Noemi; Tényi, Dalma; Csábí, Györgyi; Wilhelm, Márta. 2020. "Energy Drink Consumption, Depression, and Salutogenic Sense of Coherence Among Adolescents and Young Adults" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 4: 1290. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041290

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