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Open AccessArticle

Tit for Tat: Abusive Supervision and Knowledge Hiding-The Role of Psychological Contract Breach and Psychological Ownership

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College of Education, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310000, China
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School of Education, Murdoch University, Murdoch 6150, Western Australia
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Department of Management Sciences, Preston University, Kohat 26000, Pakistan
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School of Management, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China
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Business School, University of International Business and Economics, Beijing 100875, China
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Department of Management Sciences, Hazara University, Mansehra 21120, Pakistan
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School of Foreign Study, Anhui Sanlian University, Hefei 230026, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1240; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041240
Received: 21 January 2020 / Revised: 4 February 2020 / Accepted: 5 February 2020 / Published: 14 February 2020
The extant literature has focused on individuals’ knowledge-sharing behavior and its driving factors, which stimulate the knowledge transmission and exchange in organizations. However, little research has focused on factors that inhibit knowledge sharing and encourage individuals to hide their knowledge. Therefore, based on social exchange and displaced aggression theories, the study proposed and checked a model that examined the effect of abusive supervision on knowledge hiding (KH) via a psychological contract breach (PCB). The Psychological ownership was regarded as a boundary condition on abusive supervision and KH relationship. Using a time-lagged method, we recruited 344 full-time employees enrolled in an executive development program in a large university in China. The findings show that PCB mediates the association between abusive supervision and KH. Similarly, psychological ownership moderates the association between abusive supervision and KH. Employees with high psychological ownership minimized the effect of abusive supervision on KH. Based on study findings, contributions to theory and practice, limitations, and future directions are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: knowledge hiding; abusive supervision; psychological contract breach; psychological ownership knowledge hiding; abusive supervision; psychological contract breach; psychological ownership
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ghani, U.; Teo, T.; Li, Y.; Usman, M.; Islam, Z.U.; Gul, H.; Naeem, R.M.; Bahadar, H.; Yuan, J.; Zhai, X. Tit for Tat: Abusive Supervision and Knowledge Hiding-The Role of Psychological Contract Breach and Psychological Ownership. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1240.

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