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Article

A Meta-Regression Analysis of Utility Weights for Breast Cancer: The Power of Patients’ Experience

1
College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 03760, Korea
2
Department of Statistics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 03760, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9412; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249412
Received: 6 October 2020 / Revised: 1 December 2020 / Accepted: 9 December 2020 / Published: 15 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Trends in Health and Disease)
To summarize utility estimates of breast cancer and to assess the relative impacts of study characteristics on predicting breast cancer utilities. We searched Medline, Embase, RISS, and KoreaMed from January 1996 to April 2019 to find literature reporting utilities for breast cancer. Thirty-five articles were identified, reporting 224 utilities. A hierarchical linear model was used to conduct a meta-regression that included disease stages, assessment methods, respondent type, age of the respondents, and scale bounds as explanatory variables. The utility for early and late-stage breast cancer, as estimated by using the time-tradeoff with the scales anchored by death to perfect health with non-patients, were 0.742 and 0.525, respectively. The severity of breast cancer, assessment method, and respondent type were significant predictors of utilities, but the age of the respondents and bounds of the scale were not. Patients who experienced the health states valued 0.142 higher than did non-patients (p < 0.001). Besides the disease stage, the respondent type had the highest impact on breast cancer utility. View Full-Text
Keywords: breast cancer; utility; preferences; quality of life; meta-regression breast cancer; utility; preferences; quality of life; meta-regression
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gong, J.; Han, J.; Lee, D.; Bae, S. A Meta-Regression Analysis of Utility Weights for Breast Cancer: The Power of Patients’ Experience. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 9412. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249412

AMA Style

Gong J, Han J, Lee D, Bae S. A Meta-Regression Analysis of Utility Weights for Breast Cancer: The Power of Patients’ Experience. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(24):9412. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249412

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gong, Jiryoun; Han, Juhee; Lee, Donghwan; Bae, Seungjin. 2020. "A Meta-Regression Analysis of Utility Weights for Breast Cancer: The Power of Patients’ Experience" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 24: 9412. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249412

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