Next Article in Journal
Effects of Hearing Disability on the Employment Status Using WHODAS 2.0 in Taiwan
Next Article in Special Issue
Religiosity, Emotions, Resilience, and Wellness during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Study of Taiwanese University Students
Previous Article in Journal
Promoting Higher Quality Teacher–Child Relationships: The INSIGHTS Intervention in Rural Schools
Previous Article in Special Issue
Childhood Trauma and Experience in Close Relationships Are Associated with the God Image: Does Religiosity Make a Difference?
Article

Religious Attendance in a Secular Country Protects Adolescents from Health-Risk Behavior Only in Combination with Participation in Church Activities

1
Olomouc University Social Health Institute, Palacký University Olomouc, 771 11 Olomouc, Czech Republic
2
Department of Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands
3
Graduate School Kosice Institute for Society and Health, P.J. Safarik University in Kosice, 040 11 Kosice, Slovakia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9372; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249372
Received: 18 November 2020 / Revised: 10 December 2020 / Accepted: 12 December 2020 / Published: 15 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religiosity, Spirituality and Health)
Religiosity and spirituality have been considered to be protective factors of adolescent health-risk behavior (HRB). The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between adolescents’ HRB and their religiosity, taking into account their parents’ faith and their own participation in church activities. A nationally representative sample (n = 13377, 13.5 ± 1.7 years, 49.1% boys) of Czech adolescents participated in the 2018 Health Behavior in School-aged Children cross-sectional study. We measured religious attendance (RA), faith importance (FI) (both of respondents and their parents), participation in church activities and adolescent HRB (tobacco, alcohol, and cannabis use and early sexual intercourse). We found that neither RA nor FI of participants or their parents had a significant effect on adolescents’ HRB. Compared to attending respondents who participate in church activities (AP), non-attending respondents who participate in church activities were more likely to report smoking and early sexual intercourse, with odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 3.14 (1.54–6.39) to 3.82 (1.99–7.35). Compared to AP, non-attending respondents who did not participate in church activities were more likely to report early sexual intercourse, with OR = 1.90 (1.14–3.17). Thus, our findings show that RA does not protect adolescents from HRB; they suggest that RA protects adolescents from HRB only in combination with participation in church activities. View Full-Text
Keywords: adolescents; religiosity; spirituality; health-risk behavior; HBSC study adolescents; religiosity; spirituality; health-risk behavior; HBSC study
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Buchtova, M.; Malinakova, K.; Kosarkova, A.; Husek, V.; van Dijk, J.P.; Tavel, P. Religious Attendance in a Secular Country Protects Adolescents from Health-Risk Behavior Only in Combination with Participation in Church Activities. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 9372. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249372

AMA Style

Buchtova M, Malinakova K, Kosarkova A, Husek V, van Dijk JP, Tavel P. Religious Attendance in a Secular Country Protects Adolescents from Health-Risk Behavior Only in Combination with Participation in Church Activities. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(24):9372. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249372

Chicago/Turabian Style

Buchtova, Marie, Klara Malinakova, Alice Kosarkova, Vit Husek, Jitse P. van Dijk, and Peter Tavel. 2020. "Religious Attendance in a Secular Country Protects Adolescents from Health-Risk Behavior Only in Combination with Participation in Church Activities" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 24: 9372. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249372

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop