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Open AccessReview

Mindfulness and Shinrin-Yoku: Potential for Physiological and Psychological Interventions during Uncertain Times

1
School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
2
School of Nursing and Health Professions, University of San Francisco, 2130 Fulton Street, San Francisco, CA 94117, USA
3
School of Nursing, University of Portland, 5000 N. Willamette Blvd, Portland, OR 97203, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9340; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249340
Received: 11 November 2020 / Revised: 5 December 2020 / Accepted: 10 December 2020 / Published: 14 December 2020
Mindfulness and Shinrin-yoku (SY) translated as forest bathing, is potentially effective to alleviate mental health issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. The purpose of this article is to provide a translational and pragmatic approach to understanding mindfulness in the context of SY and psychological wellbeing through a rapid review of the literature. The background of mindfulness and SY practice are discussed and the emotional, neuroendocrine, and neurobiological responses are examined. Next, a rapid review of the literature examined six studies, published between 2010 and 2020 to determine what is known regarding the relationship between SY, mindfulness, and psychological wellbeing. The studies included 21–360 participants with a mean age of 20–55 years. The results demonstrated a significant positive correlation between nature, mindfulness, and measures of psychological wellbeing. During uncertain events, including COVID-19, weaving mindfulness with SY may be specifically important to at-risk groups, those experiencing depression, loneliness, and social isolation, and at-risk populations such as college students, veterans, and professionals with high levels of stress. The goal of this review is to provide a thorough background and support of this cost-effective modality to promote overall psychological wellbeing as a preventative measure to those at risk or experiencing psychological illnesses. View Full-Text
Keywords: mindfulness; Shinrin-yoku; forest bathing; anxiety; mental health; wellbeing mindfulness; Shinrin-yoku; forest bathing; anxiety; mental health; wellbeing
MDPI and ACS Style

Timko Olson, E.R.; Hansen, M.M.; Vermeesch, A. Mindfulness and Shinrin-Yoku: Potential for Physiological and Psychological Interventions during Uncertain Times. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 9340. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249340

AMA Style

Timko Olson ER, Hansen MM, Vermeesch A. Mindfulness and Shinrin-Yoku: Potential for Physiological and Psychological Interventions during Uncertain Times. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(24):9340. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249340

Chicago/Turabian Style

Timko Olson, Erica R.; Hansen, Margaret M.; Vermeesch, Amber. 2020. "Mindfulness and Shinrin-Yoku: Potential for Physiological and Psychological Interventions during Uncertain Times" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 24: 9340. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249340

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