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Article

Benchmarks for Evidence-Based Risk Assessment with the Swedish Version of the 4-Item Psychosocial Safety Climate Scale

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Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA), Malmö University, 205 06 Malmö, Sweden
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Section 4, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, 205 06 Malmö, Sweden
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Department of School Development and Leadership, Faculty of Education and Society, Malmö University, 205 06 Malmö, Sweden
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Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational Health Sciences and Psychology, University of Gävle, 801 76 Gävle, Sweden
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Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
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Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden
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PSC Observatory, Centre for Workplace Excellence, Justice and Society, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8675; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228675
Received: 27 October 2020 / Revised: 19 November 2020 / Accepted: 20 November 2020 / Published: 22 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Occupational Safety and Health)
The purpose of the present study was to validate the short version of The Psychosocial Safety Climate questionnaire (PSC-4, Dollard, 2019) and to establish benchmarks indicating risk levels for use in Sweden. Cross-sectional data from (1) a random sample of employees in Sweden aged 25–65 years (n = 2847) and (2) a convenience sample of non-managerial employees from 94 workplaces (n = 3066) were analyzed. Benchmarks for three PSC risk levels were developed using organizational compliance with Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) regulations as criterion. The results support the validity and usefulness of the Swedish PSC-4 as an instrument to indicate good, fair, and poor OSH practices. The recommended benchmark for indicating good OSH practices is an average score of >12.0, while the proposed cutoff for poor OSH practices is a score of ≤8.0 on the PSC-4. Scores between these benchmarks indicate fair OSH practices. Furthermore, aggregated data on PSC-4 supported its reliability as a workplace level construct and its association with quantitative demands, quality of leadership, commitment to the workplace, work engagement, job satisfaction, as well as stress and burnout. Thus, the Swedish version of PSC-4 can be regarded as a valid and reliable measure for both research and practical use for risk assessment at workplaces. View Full-Text
Keywords: psychosocial safety climate; PSC-4; occupational safety and health; OSH; risk assessment; benchmark; COPSOQ; Sweden psychosocial safety climate; PSC-4; occupational safety and health; OSH; risk assessment; benchmark; COPSOQ; Sweden
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MDPI and ACS Style

Berthelsen, H.; Muhonen, T.; Bergström, G.; Westerlund, H.; Dollard, M.F. Benchmarks for Evidence-Based Risk Assessment with the Swedish Version of the 4-Item Psychosocial Safety Climate Scale. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8675. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228675

AMA Style

Berthelsen H, Muhonen T, Bergström G, Westerlund H, Dollard MF. Benchmarks for Evidence-Based Risk Assessment with the Swedish Version of the 4-Item Psychosocial Safety Climate Scale. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(22):8675. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228675

Chicago/Turabian Style

Berthelsen, Hanne, Tuija Muhonen, Gunnar Bergström, Hugo Westerlund, and Maureen F. Dollard 2020. "Benchmarks for Evidence-Based Risk Assessment with the Swedish Version of the 4-Item Psychosocial Safety Climate Scale" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 22: 8675. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228675

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