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Open AccessArticle

“Cultural Security Is an On-Going Journey…” Exploring Views from Staff Members on the Quality and Cultural Security of Services for Aboriginal Families in Western Australia

1
School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, 207 Bouverie Street, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia
2
National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University, 7 Parker Place, Technology Park, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia
3
Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, 15 Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
4
Ngangk Yira: Murdoch University Research Centre for Aboriginal Health and Social Equity, 90 South Street, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia
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Kurongkurl Katitjin, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia
6
Curtin Medical School, Curtin University, 410 Koorliny Way, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8480; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228480
Received: 25 September 2020 / Revised: 11 November 2020 / Accepted: 13 November 2020 / Published: 16 November 2020
Cultural security is a key element of accessible services for Indigenous peoples globally, although few studies have examined this empirically. We explored the scope, reach, quality, and cultural security of health and social services available to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander families in Western Australia (WA), from the point of view of staff from the services. We recruited staff from health and social services for Aboriginal people in the Perth, Kalgoorlie, Great Southern, and South West regions of WA between December 2015 and September 2017 to complete online surveys. We examined the proportions of participants that responded saying the service was culturally secure, the reasons for the response, and perceived factors related to a high-quality service. Sixty participants from 21 services responded to the survey. Seventy-three percent stated the service was culturally secure; however, only 36% stated that the staff employed at the service had sufficient knowledge on cultural security. Participants suggested having Aboriginal staff and better cultural awareness training as methods to improve cultural security within the service. Participants highlighted that staffing, funding for resources, and patient financial difficulties in accessing care as key areas for quality improvement. Much greater effort is required in improving knowledge through on-going training of staff in the practice of culturally safe care. Organisations must also be required to meet specific standards in cultural safety. View Full-Text
Keywords: cultural security; Aboriginal health; services cultural security; Aboriginal health; services
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gubhaju, L.; Williams, R.; Jones, J.; Hamer, D.; Shepherd, C.; McAullay, D.; Eades, S.J.; McNamara, B. “Cultural Security Is an On-Going Journey…” Exploring Views from Staff Members on the Quality and Cultural Security of Services for Aboriginal Families in Western Australia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8480. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228480

AMA Style

Gubhaju L, Williams R, Jones J, Hamer D, Shepherd C, McAullay D, Eades SJ, McNamara B. “Cultural Security Is an On-Going Journey…” Exploring Views from Staff Members on the Quality and Cultural Security of Services for Aboriginal Families in Western Australia. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(22):8480. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228480

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gubhaju, Lina; Williams, Robyn; Jones, Jocelyn; Hamer, David; Shepherd, Carrington; McAullay, Dan; Eades, Sandra J.; McNamara, Bridgette. 2020. "“Cultural Security Is an On-Going Journey…” Exploring Views from Staff Members on the Quality and Cultural Security of Services for Aboriginal Families in Western Australia" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 22: 8480. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228480

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