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Article

A Parental Smoking Cessation Intervention in the Pediatric Emergency Setting: A Randomized Trial

1
Division of Emergency Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229–3026, USA
2
College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA
3
Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229–3026, USA
4
Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229–3026, USA
5
School of Human Services, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221, USA
6
College of Nursing, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8151; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218151
Received: 21 September 2020 / Revised: 30 October 2020 / Accepted: 1 November 2020 / Published: 4 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smoking Cessation)
We examined the efficacy of a pediatric emergency visit-based screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) condition compared to a control condition (Healthy Habits Control, HHC) to help parental smokers quit smoking. We enrolled 750 parental smokers who presented to the pediatric emergency setting with their child into a two-group randomized controlled clinical trial. SBIRT participants received brief cessation coaching, quitting resources, and up to 12-weeks of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). HHC participants received healthy lifestyle coaching and resources. The primary outcome was point-prevalence tobacco abstinence at six weeks (T1) and six months (T2). The mean (SD) age of parents was 31.8 (7.7) years, and 86.8% were female, 52.7% were Black, and 64.6% had an income of ≤$15,000. Overall abstinence rates were not statistically significant with 4.2% in both groups at T1 and 12.9% and 8.3% in the SBIRT and HHC groups, respectively, at T2. There were statistically significant differences in SBIRT versus HHC participants on the median (IQR) reduction of daily cigarettes smoked at T1 from baseline (−2 [−5, 0] versus 0 [−4, 0], p = 0.0008),at T2 from baseline (−4 [−9, −1] vs. −2 [−5, 0], p = 0.0006), and on the mean (SD) number of quit attempts at T2 from baseline (1.25 (6.5) vs. 0.02 (4.71), p = 0.02). Self-reported quitting rates were higher in SBIRT parents who received NRT (83.3% vs. 50.9%, p = 0.04). The novel use of the pediatric emergency visit to conduct cessation interventions helped parents quit smoking. The near equivalent abstinence rates in both the SBIRT and HHC groups may be due to underlying parental concern about their child’s health. Cessation interventions in this setting may result in adult and pediatric public health benefits. View Full-Text
Keywords: tobacco; cessation; emergency department; parents; secondhand smoke tobacco; cessation; emergency department; parents; secondhand smoke
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mahabee-Gittens, E.M.; Ammerman, R.T.; Khoury, J.C.; Tabangin, M.E.; Ding, L.; Merianos, A.L.; Stone, L.; Gordon, J.S. A Parental Smoking Cessation Intervention in the Pediatric Emergency Setting: A Randomized Trial. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8151. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218151

AMA Style

Mahabee-Gittens EM, Ammerman RT, Khoury JC, Tabangin ME, Ding L, Merianos AL, Stone L, Gordon JS. A Parental Smoking Cessation Intervention in the Pediatric Emergency Setting: A Randomized Trial. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(21):8151. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218151

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mahabee-Gittens, E. M., Robert T. Ammerman, Jane C. Khoury, Meredith E. Tabangin, Lili Ding, Ashley L. Merianos, Lara Stone, and Judith S. Gordon 2020. "A Parental Smoking Cessation Intervention in the Pediatric Emergency Setting: A Randomized Trial" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 21: 8151. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218151

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