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Open AccessArticle

Neighborhood Social and Built Environment and Disparities in the Risk of Hypertension: A Cross-Sectional Study

Department of Environmental Science, Vytautas Magnus University, K. Donelaicio 58, 44248 Kaunas, Lithuania
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7696; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207696
Received: 16 September 2020 / Revised: 17 October 2020 / Accepted: 20 October 2020 / Published: 21 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Space, Place and Health Outcomes)
Citizens’ participation in urban environmental quality assessment is important when identifying local problems in the sustainable development and environmental planning policy. The principal aim of this study was to analyze whether any social differences exist between the joint effect of built neighborhood quality and exposure to urban green spaces and the risk of hypertension. The study sample consisted of 580 participants residing in 11 districts in Kaunas city, Lithuania. Using geographic information systems (GIS), individual data on the socioeconomic status (SES) and health were linked to the participants’ perceptions of the environmental quality and exposure to green spaces (NDVI). We used multivariate logistic regression to estimate associations as odds ratios (OR). Those study participants with lower education and those study participants with higher education on low incomes rated their health significantly worse. Low SES persons residing in areas with low exposure to green spaces had a significantly higher risk of hypertension when sex, age, family status, smoking, and income were accounted for (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.01–3.36). This citizen science study provided evidence that the social environment and the quality of the built environment had a complex effect on disparities in the risk of hypertension. View Full-Text
Keywords: socioeconomic status; neighborhoods; disparities; hypertension; citizen science; epidemiological study socioeconomic status; neighborhoods; disparities; hypertension; citizen science; epidemiological study
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Grazuleviciene, R.; Andrusaityte, S.; Gražulevičius, T.; Dėdelė, A. Neighborhood Social and Built Environment and Disparities in the Risk of Hypertension: A Cross-Sectional Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7696.

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