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Article

Exploring the Link between Work Addiction Risk and Health-Related Outcomes Using Job-Demand-Control Model

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Université Clermont Auvergne, CNRS, LaPSCo, Physiological and Psychosocial Stress, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, University Hospital of Clermont-Ferrand, Preventive and Occupational Medicine, Witty Fit, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France
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Institute of Education, National Research University Higher School of Economics, 101000 Moscow, Russia
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Psychology Department, University Hospital of Clermont-Ferrand, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France
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WittyFit, F-75000 Paris, France
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Psychology Department, Physiological and Psychosocial Stress, Université Clermont Auvergne, CNRS, LaPSCo, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France
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Culture and Social Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, School of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100080, China
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Centre for Health and Exercise Science Research, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong
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Psychology Department, University Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, LPNC, 38000 Grenoble, France
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Emergency department, University Hospital of Clermont-Ferrand, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France
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Biostatistics Unit, University Hospital of Clermont-Ferrand, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7594; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207594
Received: 22 August 2020 / Revised: 7 October 2020 / Accepted: 7 October 2020 / Published: 19 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancing Workaholism Research)
Purpose of the study: Work addiction risk is a growing public health concern with potential deleterious health-related outcomes. Perception of work (job demands and job control) may play a major role in provoking the risk of work addiction in employees. We aimed to explore the link between work addiction risk and health-related outcomes using the framework of job-demand-control model. Methods: Data were collected from 187 out of 1580 (11.8%) French workers who agreed to participate in a cross-sectional study using the WittyFit software online platform. The self-administered questionnaires were the Job Content Questionnaire by Karasek, the Work Addiction Risk Test, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale and socio-demographics. Data Analysis: Statistical analyses were performed using the Stata software (version 13). Results: There were five times more workers with a high risk of work addiction among those with strong job demands than in those with low job demands (29.8% vs. 6.8%, p = 0.002). Addiction to work was not linked to job control (p = 0.77), nor with social support (p = 0.22). We demonstrated a high risk of work addiction in 2.6% of low-strain workers, in 15.0% of passive workers, in 28.9% of active workers, and in 33.3% of high-strain workers (p = 0.010). There were twice as many workers with a HAD-Depression score ≥11 compared with workers at low risk (41.5% vs. 17.7%, p = 0.009). Sleep quality was lower in workers with a high risk of work addiction compared with workers with a low risk of work addiction (44.0 ± 27.3 vs. 64.4 ± 26.8, p < 0.001). Workers with a high risk of work addiction exhibited greater stress at work (68.4 ± 23.2 vs. 47.5 ± 25.1) and lower well-being (69.7 ± 18.3 vs. 49.3 ± 23.0) compared with workers at low risk (p < 0.001). Conclusions: High job demands are strongly associated with the risk of work addiction. Work addiction risk is associated with greater depression and poor quality of sleep. Preventive strategies should benefit from identifying more vulnerable workers to work addiction risk. View Full-Text
Keywords: workaholism; work addiction risk; mental health; depression; quality of sleep; public health workaholism; work addiction risk; mental health; depression; quality of sleep; public health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Dutheil, F.; Charkhabi, M.; Ravoux, H.; Brousse, G.; Dewavrin, S.; Cornet, T.; Mondillon, L.; Han, S.; Pfabigan, D.; S Baker, J.; Mermillod, M.; Schmidt, J.; Moustafa, F.; Pereira, B. Exploring the Link between Work Addiction Risk and Health-Related Outcomes Using Job-Demand-Control Model. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7594. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207594

AMA Style

Dutheil F, Charkhabi M, Ravoux H, Brousse G, Dewavrin S, Cornet T, Mondillon L, Han S, Pfabigan D, S Baker J, Mermillod M, Schmidt J, Moustafa F, Pereira B. Exploring the Link between Work Addiction Risk and Health-Related Outcomes Using Job-Demand-Control Model. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(20):7594. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207594

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dutheil, Frédéric, Morteza Charkhabi, Hortense Ravoux, Georges Brousse, Samuel Dewavrin, Thomas Cornet, Laurie Mondillon, Sihui Han, Daniela Pfabigan, Julien S Baker, Martial Mermillod, Jeannot Schmidt, Fares Moustafa, and Bruno Pereira. 2020. "Exploring the Link between Work Addiction Risk and Health-Related Outcomes Using Job-Demand-Control Model" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 20: 7594. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207594

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