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Open AccessArticle

Explaining Income-Related Inequalities in Dietary Knowledge: Evidence from the China Health and Nutrition Survey

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School of Public Policy and Administration, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China
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Department of Health Management, School of Medicine and Health Management, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China
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Medical College, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121, China
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Department of Clinical Sciences, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool L3 5QA, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 532; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020532
Received: 25 October 2019 / Revised: 4 January 2020 / Accepted: 9 January 2020 / Published: 15 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Public Health and Epidemiology)
Lack of adequate dietary knowledge may result in poor health conditions. This study aims to measure income-related inequality in dietary knowledge, and to explain the sources of the inequality. Data were from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) conducted in 2015. A summary of the dietary knowledge score and dietary guideline awareness was used to measure the dietary knowledge of respondents. The concentration index was employed as a measure of socioeconomic inequality and was decomposed into its determining factors. The study found that the proportion of respondents who correctly answered questions on dietary knowledge was significantly low for some questions. Compared to rural residents, urban residents had a higher proportion of correctly answered dietary knowledge questions. In addition, there are pro-rich inequalities in dietary knowledge. This observed inequality is determined not only by individual factors but also high-level area factors. Our study recommends that future dietary education programs could take different strategies for individuals with different educational levels and focus more on disadvantaged people. It would be beneficial to consider local dietary habits in developing education materials. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary knowledge; income-related inequality; concentration index; decomposition analysis dietary knowledge; income-related inequality; concentration index; decomposition analysis
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Xu, Y.; Zhu, S.; Zhang, T.; Wang, D.; Hu, J.; Gao, J.; Zhou, Z. Explaining Income-Related Inequalities in Dietary Knowledge: Evidence from the China Health and Nutrition Survey. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 532.

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