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Article

Ecological Engineering for the Optimisation of the Land-Based Marine Aquaculture of Coastal Shellfish

1
Department of Coastal Systems, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research and Utrecht University, P.O. Box 59, 1790 AB Den Burg (Texel), The Netherlands
2
Meromar Seafoods B.V., Celsiusstraat 15, 8861 NE Harlingen, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7224; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197224
Received: 25 August 2020 / Revised: 28 September 2020 / Accepted: 30 September 2020 / Published: 2 October 2020
Whilst the demand for nutritious and sustainable seafood is increasing, fishing yields are declining due to overfishing and climate change. The inshore aquaculture of marine molluscs—e.g., the suspension-feeding cockle Cerastoderma edule for NW Europe—might be an alternative practice if cost-effective and nature-based technology enhances growth and survival. Our inshore experiments revealed that increasing the seawater residence time resulted in improved water quality. The reduction in sediment loads and stimulation of pelagic microalgal growth resulted in enhanced shell growth and meat content of the wild cockles seeded into the system. Shorter residence times resulted also in an increase in benthic microalgae, but the concurrent increase in silt content of the sediment appeared to hamper effective filtration by cockles. The growth conditions (with respect to the water and sediment quality) for the inshore cultivation of cockles can indeed be improved by means of ecological engineering, suggesting that the inshore aquaculture of marine shellfish can provide sustainable food and income for coastal communities, in particular when the shellfish farms are located in low-lying salinized coastal areas where common agriculture practices are no longer profitable. The involvement of the shellfishery industry was and will be crucial for studying and understanding the complex practice of cockle cultivation. View Full-Text
Keywords: Cerastoderma edule; survival; growth; phytoplankton; microphytobenthos; median grain size; silt content; flushing rates Cerastoderma edule; survival; growth; phytoplankton; microphytobenthos; median grain size; silt content; flushing rates
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MDPI and ACS Style

Philippart, C.J.M.; Dethmers, K.E.M.; van der Molen, J.; Seinen, A. Ecological Engineering for the Optimisation of the Land-Based Marine Aquaculture of Coastal Shellfish. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7224. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197224

AMA Style

Philippart CJM, Dethmers KEM, van der Molen J, Seinen A. Ecological Engineering for the Optimisation of the Land-Based Marine Aquaculture of Coastal Shellfish. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(19):7224. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197224

Chicago/Turabian Style

Philippart, Catharina J.M., Kiki E.M. Dethmers, Johan van der Molen, and André Seinen. 2020. "Ecological Engineering for the Optimisation of the Land-Based Marine Aquaculture of Coastal Shellfish" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 19: 7224. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197224

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