Next Article in Journal
Emotion Regulation Style and Daily Rumination: Potential Mediators between Affect and Both Depression and Anxiety during Adolescence
Next Article in Special Issue
Sexual Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviours among Undergraduate Students in China—Implications for Sex Education
Previous Article in Journal
Why Do Consumers Make Green Purchase Decisions? Insights from a Systematic Review
Previous Article in Special Issue
Insomnia in Relation to Academic Performance, Self-Reported Health, Physical Activity, and Substance Use Among Adolescents
Article

A Qualitative Study Exploring Menstruation Experiences and Practices among Adolescent Girls Living in the Nakivale Refugee Settlement, Uganda

1
Faculty of Interdisciplinary Studies, Mbarara University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 1410 Mbarara, Uganda
2
Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany
3
Division of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Medical Centre of the University of Munich (LMU), 80802 Munich, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Both authors contributed equally to this manuscript.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6613; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186613
Received: 11 July 2020 / Revised: 31 August 2020 / Accepted: 9 September 2020 / Published: 11 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adolescent and Young People's Health Issues and Challenges)
(1) Background: Girls in low- and lower-middle income countries face challenges in menstrual health management (MHM), which impact their health and schooling. This might be exacerbated by refugee conditions. This study aimed at describing menstruation practices and experiences of adolescent girls in Nakivale refugee settlement in Southwestern Uganda. (2) Methods: We conducted a qualitative study from March to May 2018 and we intentionally selected participants to broadly represent different age groups and countries of origin. We conducted 28 semistructured interviews and two focus group discussions. Data were transcribed and translated into English. Analysis included data familiarization, manual coding, generation and refining of themes. (3) Results: Main findings included: (a) challenging social context with negative experiences during migration, family separation and scarcity of resources for livelihood within the settlement; (b) unfavorable menstruation experiences, including unpreparedness for menarche and lack of knowledge, limitations in activity and leisure, pain, school absenteeism and psychosocial effects; (c) menstrual practices, including use of unsuitable alternatives for MHM and poor health-seeking behavior. (4) Conclusions: A multipronged approach to MHM management is crucial, including comprehensive sexual education, enhancement of parent–adolescent communication, health sector partnership and support from NGOs to meet the tailored needs of adolescent girls. View Full-Text
Keywords: refugee; adolescent; menstruation; sexual and reproductive health; migration; Uganda; Africa refugee; adolescent; menstruation; sexual and reproductive health; migration; Uganda; Africa
MDPI and ACS Style

Kemigisha, E.; Rai, M.; Mlahagwa, W.; Nyakato, V.N.; Ivanova, O. A Qualitative Study Exploring Menstruation Experiences and Practices among Adolescent Girls Living in the Nakivale Refugee Settlement, Uganda. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6613. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186613

AMA Style

Kemigisha E, Rai M, Mlahagwa W, Nyakato VN, Ivanova O. A Qualitative Study Exploring Menstruation Experiences and Practices among Adolescent Girls Living in the Nakivale Refugee Settlement, Uganda. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(18):6613. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186613

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kemigisha, Elizabeth, Masna Rai, Wendo Mlahagwa, Viola N. Nyakato, and Olena Ivanova. 2020. "A Qualitative Study Exploring Menstruation Experiences and Practices among Adolescent Girls Living in the Nakivale Refugee Settlement, Uganda" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 18: 6613. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186613

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop