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Erratum published on 23 September 2020, see Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 6949.
Article

Changes in Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Response to COVID-19 and Their Associations with Mental Health in 3052 US Adults

1
Department of Kinesiology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
2
The Irish Longitudinal Study on Aging and School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, The University of Dublin, Dublin D02 R590, Ireland
3
Cambridge Centre for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 2LZ, UK
4
Institute of Mental Health Sciences, Ulster University, Coleraine BT37 0QB, UK
5
Physical Activity for Health Research Cluster, Health Research Institute, Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Limerick, V94 T9PX Limerick, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6469; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186469
Received: 7 August 2020 / Revised: 25 August 2020 / Accepted: 2 September 2020 / Published: 5 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Exercise and Health)
The COVID-19 pandemic altered many facets of life. We aimed to evaluate the impact of COVID-19-related public health guidelines on physical activity (PA), sedentary behavior, mental health, and their interrelations. Cross-sectional data were collected from 3052 US adults 3–8 April 2020 (from all 50 states). Participants self-reported pre- and post-COVID-19 levels of moderate and vigorous PA, sitting, and screen time. Currently-followed public health guidelines, stress, loneliness, positive mental health (PMH), social connectedness, and depressive and anxiety symptoms were self-reported. Participants were grouped by meeting US PA guidelines, reporting ≥8 h/day of sitting, or ≥8 h/day of screen time, pre- and post-COVID-19. Overall, 62% of participants were female, with age ranging from 18–24 (16.6% of sample) to 75+ (9.3%). Self-reported PA was lower post-COVID among participants reporting being previously active (mean change: −32.3% [95% CI: −36.3%, −28.1%]) but largely unchanged among previously inactive participants (+2.3% [−3.5%, +8.1%]). No longer meeting PA guidelines and increased screen time were associated with worse depression, loneliness, stress, and PMH (p < 0.001). Self-isolation/quarantine was associated with higher depressive and anxiety symptoms compared to social distancing (p < 0.001). Maintaining and enhancing physical activity participation and limiting screen time increases during abrupt societal changes may mitigate the mental health consequences. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID; physical activity; screen time; sitting time; sedentary; mental health; public health; depression; anxiety; loneliness COVID; physical activity; screen time; sitting time; sedentary; mental health; public health; depression; anxiety; loneliness
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MDPI and ACS Style

Meyer, J.; McDowell, C.; Lansing, J.; Brower, C.; Smith, L.; Tully, M.; Herring, M. Changes in Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Response to COVID-19 and Their Associations with Mental Health in 3052 US Adults. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6469. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186469

AMA Style

Meyer J, McDowell C, Lansing J, Brower C, Smith L, Tully M, Herring M. Changes in Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Response to COVID-19 and Their Associations with Mental Health in 3052 US Adults. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(18):6469. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186469

Chicago/Turabian Style

Meyer, Jacob, Cillian McDowell, Jeni Lansing, Cassandra Brower, Lee Smith, Mark Tully, and Matthew Herring. 2020. "Changes in Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Response to COVID-19 and Their Associations with Mental Health in 3052 US Adults" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 18: 6469. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186469

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