Next Article in Journal
Neighborhood Socioeconomic Deprivation Associated with Fat Mass and Weight Status in Youth
Next Article in Special Issue
Compliance with the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in Slovakia and in Finland: Two Different Worlds
Previous Article in Journal
Evaluation of a Suicide Prevention Program for the Energy Sector
Previous Article in Special Issue
Perceptions, Predictors of and Motivation for Quitting among Smokers from Six European Countries from 2016 to 2018: Findings from EUREST-PLUS ITC Europe Surveys
Open AccessArticle

Do Daily Compensatory Health Beliefs Predict Intention to Quit and Smoking Behavior? A Daily Diary Study during Smoking Cessation

1
Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, Binzmuehlestrasse 14, 8050 Zurich, Switzerland
2
School of Psychology and Psychotherapy, Witten/Herdecke University; Alfred-Herrhausen-Straße 45, 58455 Witten, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6419; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176419
Received: 18 June 2020 / Revised: 31 August 2020 / Accepted: 31 August 2020 / Published: 3 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control)
Compensatory health beliefs (CHBs) are a means to cope with motivational conflicts between intended health goals and the temptation for an unhealthy behavior. As CHBs can fluctuate on a daily basis, this study examined how daily CHBs are associated with daily intention to quit smoking and daily number of cigarettes smoked before and after a quit date at the between- and within-person level. The study comprised a prospective longitudinal design and investigated 83 women and 83 men for 32 consecutive days during an ongoing joint self-set quit attempt. Daily CHBs varied from day to day and between individuals. At the between-person level, higher women’s mean CHBs were associated with lower intention (b = −0.23, p = 0.04) and at the 10% level with more cigarettes smoked after the quit date (rate ratio (RR) = 1.92, p = 0.07). At the within-person level, women’s higher than usual CHBs were unrelated to intention to quit, but were related to less smoking before (RR = 0.96, p = 0.03) and at the 10% level after the quit date (RR = 0.91, p = 0.09). A marginally positive association between daily CHBs and smoking at the within-person level emerged for men. The negative effect of daily CHBs at the between-person level on smoking seems to unfold after the quit attempt and for women only. View Full-Text
Keywords: compensatory health beliefs; smoking cessation; intention; ecological momentary assessment compensatory health beliefs; smoking cessation; intention; ecological momentary assessment
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Amrein, M.A.; Lüscher, J.; Berli, C.; Radtke, T.; Scholz, U. Do Daily Compensatory Health Beliefs Predict Intention to Quit and Smoking Behavior? A Daily Diary Study during Smoking Cessation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6419.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop