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Open AccessArticle

Personal and Environmental Contributors to Sedentary Behavior of Older Adults in Independent and Assisted Living Facilities

1
Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA
2
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA
3
Department of Health and Human Development, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA
4
Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6415; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176415
Received: 19 August 2020 / Revised: 31 August 2020 / Accepted: 1 September 2020 / Published: 3 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Collection Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
Sedentary behavior is associated with negative health outcomes and unhealthy aging. Older adults are the most sedentary age group, and decreasing sitting time represents an intervention target for improving health. Determinants of sedentary behavior have been examined in older adults living in their own homes, yet less is known about sedentary behavior of older adults in residential care facilities. The purpose of this study was to explore factors contributing to sedentary behavior among residents of independent and assisted living facilities. We conducted eight focus groups with residents (n = 44) and semi-structured interviews with staff (n = 6) across four living facilities. Audio recordings were transcribed and analyzed using an iterative, inductive approach. Three salient themes were identified. Residents and staff both viewed sedentary behavior negatively unless it was in the context of social engagement. Additionally, fear of falling was discussed as a significant contributor to sedentary behavior. Finally, residents felt the community living environment contributed to their sedentary behavior while staff did not. Our findings provide valuable insight for designing targeted interventions for older adults in residential facilities and suggest thinking beyond the individual and considering environmental influences on sedentary behavior in the residential care setting. View Full-Text
Keywords: sedentary behavior; older adults; residential care; focus groups; thematic analysis; qualitative research sedentary behavior; older adults; residential care; focus groups; thematic analysis; qualitative research
MDPI and ACS Style

Kotlarczyk, M.P.; Hergenroeder, A.L.; Gibbs, B.B.; Cameron, F.A.; Hamm, M.E.; Brach, J.S. Personal and Environmental Contributors to Sedentary Behavior of Older Adults in Independent and Assisted Living Facilities. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6415.

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