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Article

Spatial Analysis of the Neighborhood Risk Factors for Respiratory Health in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT): Implications for Emergency Planning

1
École des Haute Études en Santé Publique (EHESP), 35043 Rennes, France
2
National Centre for Geographic Resources & Analysis in in Primary Health Care (GRAPHC), Canberra 2601, Australia
3
Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra 2601, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6396; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176396
Received: 4 August 2020 / Revised: 19 August 2020 / Accepted: 27 August 2020 / Published: 2 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS and Spatial Modelling for Environmental Epidemiology)
The Australian Capital Territory (ACT) experienced the worst air quality in the world for several consecutive days following the 2019–2020 Australian bushfires. With a focus on asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), this retrospective study examined the neighborhood-level risk factors for these diseases from 2011 to 2013, including household distance to hospital emergency departments (ED) and general practices (GP) and area-level socioeconomic disadvantage and demographic characteristics at a high spatial resolution. Poisson and Geographically Weighted Poisson Regression (GWR) were compared to examine the need for spatially explicit models. GWR performed significantly better, with rates of both respiratory diseases positively associated with area-level socioeconomic disadvantage. Asthma rates were positively associated with increasing distance from a hospital. Increasing distance to GP was not associated with asthma or COPD rates. These results suggest that respiratory health improvements could be made by prioritizing areas of socioeconomic disadvantage. The ACT has a relatively high density of GP that is geographically well spaced. This distribution of GP could be leveraged to improve emergency response planning in the future. View Full-Text
Keywords: respiratory health; spatial analysis; health services; environmental health; planning respiratory health; spatial analysis; health services; environmental health; planning
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MDPI and ACS Style

Davies, S.; Konings, P.; Lal, A. Spatial Analysis of the Neighborhood Risk Factors for Respiratory Health in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT): Implications for Emergency Planning. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6396. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176396

AMA Style

Davies S, Konings P, Lal A. Spatial Analysis of the Neighborhood Risk Factors for Respiratory Health in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT): Implications for Emergency Planning. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(17):6396. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176396

Chicago/Turabian Style

Davies, Sarah, Paul Konings, and Aparna Lal. 2020. "Spatial Analysis of the Neighborhood Risk Factors for Respiratory Health in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT): Implications for Emergency Planning" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 17: 6396. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176396

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