Next Article in Journal
Sleep and Prospective Memory: A Retrospective Study in Different Clinical Populations
Next Article in Special Issue
Adaptation and Evaluation of the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey in Stores to Assess Mediterranean Food Environments (NEMS-S-MED)
Previous Article in Journal
Relationships between Linear Sprint, Lower-Body Power Output and Change of Direction Performance in Elite Soccer Players
Previous Article in Special Issue
Community Group Model Building as a Method for Engaging Participants and Mobilising Action in Public Health
Article

Benchmarking the Nutrition-Related Policies and Commitments of Major Food Companies in Australia, 2018

1
Global Obesity Centre (GLOBE), Institute for Health Transformation, School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia
2
School of Nutrition, Université Laval, Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
3
Sciensano, Brussels, 1050 Ixelles, Belgium
4
School of Population Health, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6118; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176118
Received: 2 August 2020 / Revised: 17 August 2020 / Accepted: 20 August 2020 / Published: 22 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Systems, Food Environment, Diet and Nutrition Related Diseases)
The food industry has an important role to play in efforts to improve population diets. This study aimed to benchmark the comprehensiveness, specificity and transparency of nutrition-related policies and commitments of major food companies in Australia. In 2018, we applied the Business Impact Assessment on Obesity and Population Level Nutrition (BIA-Obesity) tool and process to quantitatively assess company policies across six domains. Thirty-four companies operating in Australia were assessed, including the largest packaged food and non-alcoholic beverage manufacturers (n = 19), supermarkets (n = 4) and quick-service restaurants (n = 11). Publicly available company information was collected, supplemented by information gathered through engagement with company representatives. Sixteen out of 34 companies (47%) engaged with data collection processes. Company scores ranged from 3/100 to 71/100 (median: 40.5/100), with substantial variation by sector, company and domain. This study demonstrated that, while some food companies had made commitments to address population nutrition and obesity-related issues, the overall response from the food industry fell short of global benchmarks of good practice. Future studies should assess both company policies and practices. In the absence of stronger industry action, government regulations, such as mandatory front-of-pack nutrition labelling and restrictions on unhealthy food marketing, are urgently needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: accountability; commercial determinants of health; food company; obesity; policy; population nutrition accountability; commercial determinants of health; food company; obesity; policy; population nutrition
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Sacks, G.; Robinson, E.; Cameron, A.J.; Vanderlee, L.; Vandevijvere, S.; Swinburn, B. Benchmarking the Nutrition-Related Policies and Commitments of Major Food Companies in Australia, 2018. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6118. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176118

AMA Style

Sacks G, Robinson E, Cameron AJ, Vanderlee L, Vandevijvere S, Swinburn B. Benchmarking the Nutrition-Related Policies and Commitments of Major Food Companies in Australia, 2018. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(17):6118. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176118

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sacks, Gary, Ella Robinson, Adrian J. Cameron, Lana Vanderlee, Stefanie Vandevijvere, and Boyd Swinburn. 2020. "Benchmarking the Nutrition-Related Policies and Commitments of Major Food Companies in Australia, 2018" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 17: 6118. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176118

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop