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Article

Quantification of Exposure to Risk Postures in Truck Assembly Operators: Neck, Back, Arms and Wrists

1
Univ Angers, CHU Angers, Univ Rennes, Inserm, EHESP, Irset (Institut de Recherche en Santé, Environnement et Travail)—UMR_S 1085, F-49000 Angers, France
2
ERCOS Group (Pôle), Laboratory of ELLIAD-EA4661, UTBM-University of Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Belfort 90001, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6062; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176062
Received: 27 June 2020 / Revised: 10 August 2020 / Accepted: 17 August 2020 / Published: 20 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Knowledge for a Better Occupational Health and Safety Management)
The study assessed the proportion of time in risky postures for the main joints of the upper limbs in a truck assembly plant and explored the association with musculoskeletal symptoms. Fourteen workstations (13 individuals) of a truck assembly plant were selected, and seven sensors were placed on the body segments of the participants. The sensors included tri-axial accelerometers for the arms and back, inclinometers for the neck and electro-goniometry for quantifying flexion/extension of the right and left hands. The proportions of time in moderate awkward postures were high at all workstations. Neck and wrist excessive awkward postures were observed for most workstations. The average values of the 91st percentile for back flexion and right/left arm elevation were 25°, 62°, and 57°, respectively. The 91st and 9th percentile averages for neck flexion/extension were 35.9° and −4.7°, respectively. An insignificant relationship was found between the percentage of time spent in awkward upper limb posture and musculoskeletal symptoms. The findings provide objective and quantitative data about time exposure, variability, and potential risk factors in the real workplace. Quantitative measurements in the field provide objective data of the body postures and movements of tasks that can be helpful in the musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) prevention program. View Full-Text
Keywords: ergonomics; quantitative measurement; risk evaluation; musculoskeletal disorders; automotive assembly plant ergonomics; quantitative measurement; risk evaluation; musculoskeletal disorders; automotive assembly plant
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zare, M.; Bodin, J.; Sagot, J.-C.; Roquelaure, Y. Quantification of Exposure to Risk Postures in Truck Assembly Operators: Neck, Back, Arms and Wrists. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6062. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176062

AMA Style

Zare M, Bodin J, Sagot J-C, Roquelaure Y. Quantification of Exposure to Risk Postures in Truck Assembly Operators: Neck, Back, Arms and Wrists. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(17):6062. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176062

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zare, Mohsen, Julie Bodin, Jean-Claude Sagot, and Yves Roquelaure. 2020. "Quantification of Exposure to Risk Postures in Truck Assembly Operators: Neck, Back, Arms and Wrists" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 17: 6062. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176062

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