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Open AccessArticle

Drivers of the Adoption and Exclusive Use of Clean Fuel for Cooking in Sub-Saharan Africa: Learnings and Policy Considerations from Cameroon

1
Public Health England North West, Preston PR1 0LD, UK
2
Department of Public Health and Policy and Systems, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GB, UK
3
Department of Health Services Research and Policy, Faculty of Public Health & Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1H 9SH, UK
4
Douala General Hospital, Douala 3554, Cameroon
5
Global LPG Partnership, New York, NY 10065, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5874; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165874
Received: 22 June 2020 / Revised: 8 August 2020 / Accepted: 10 August 2020 / Published: 13 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
Household air pollution (HAP) caused by the combustion of solid fuels for cooking and heating is responsible for almost 5% of the global burden of disease. In response, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has recommended the urgent need to scale the adoption of clean fuels, such as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). To understand the drivers of the adoption and exclusive use of LPG for cooking, we analysed representative survey data from 3343 peri-urban and rural households in Southwest Cameroon. Surveys used standardised tools to collect information on fuel use, socio-demographic and household characteristics and use of LPG for clean cooking. Most households reported LPG to be clean (95%) and efficient (88%), but many also perceived it to be expensive (69%) and unsafe (64%). Positive perceptions about LPG’s safety (OR = 2.49, 95% CI = 2.04, 3.05), cooking speed (OR = 4.31, 95% CI = 2.62, 7.10), affordability (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.38, 2.09), availability (OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.72, 2.73), and its ability to cook most dishes (OR = 3.79, 95% CI = 2.87, 5.01), were significantly associated with exclusive LPG use. Socio-economic status (higher education) and household wealth (higher income) were also associated with a greater likelihood of LPG adoption. Effective strategies to raise awareness around safe use of LPG and interventions to address financial barriers are needed to scale wider adoption and sustained use of LPG for clean cooking, displacing reliance on polluting solid fuels. View Full-Text
Keywords: household air pollution; clean cooking; clean fuel; LPG; Cameroon; Sub-Saharan Africa household air pollution; clean cooking; clean fuel; LPG; Cameroon; Sub-Saharan Africa
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Pye, A.; Ronzi, S.; Mbatchou Ngahane, B.H.; Puzzolo, E.; Ashu, A.H.; Pope, D. Drivers of the Adoption and Exclusive Use of Clean Fuel for Cooking in Sub-Saharan Africa: Learnings and Policy Considerations from Cameroon. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 5874.

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