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Open AccessArticle

Perspectives of Health Care Providers on the Role of Culture in the Self-Care of Patients with Chronic Heart Failure: A Qualitative Interview Study

1
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, 58183 Linköping, Sweden
2
Heart Failure Unit, Cardiology Department, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva 49100, Israel
3
Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel
4
Cardiology Division, Soroka University Medical Centre, and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel
5
Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, 58183 Linköping, Sweden
6
Department of Cardiology, Linköping University Hospital, 58183 Linköping, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5051; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145051
Received: 5 June 2020 / Revised: 7 July 2020 / Accepted: 9 July 2020 / Published: 14 July 2020
Background: Self-care is important in chronic diseases such as heart failure. The cultural background of health care providers might influence their view on self-care behaviour and education they provide. The aim of this study was to describe health care providers’ perceptions of the role of culture in self-care and how those perceptions shape their experiences and their practices. Methods: A qualitative study was performed in Israel, a country with a culturally diverse population. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with 12 healthcare providers from different cultural backgrounds. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis. Results: Healthcare providers experienced cultural background influenced their patients’ self-care behaviour. Perceived culture-specific barriers to self-care such as dietary traditions interfering with the recommended diet, willingness to undertake self-care and beliefs conflicting with medical treatment were identified. Healthcare providers described that they adapted patient education and care based on the cultural background of the patients. Shared cultural background, awareness and knowledge of differences were described as positively influencing self-care education, while cultural differences could complicate this process. Conclusions: Cultural-specific barriers for self-care were perceived by health care providers and they identified that their own cultural background shapes their experiences and their practices. View Full-Text
Keywords: self-care; intervention; culture; qualitative health care providers self-care; intervention; culture; qualitative health care providers
MDPI and ACS Style

Jönsson, A.; Cewers, E.; Ben Gal, T.; Weinstein, J.M.; Strömberg, A.; Jaarsma, T. Perspectives of Health Care Providers on the Role of Culture in the Self-Care of Patients with Chronic Heart Failure: A Qualitative Interview Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 5051. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145051

AMA Style

Jönsson A, Cewers E, Ben Gal T, Weinstein JM, Strömberg A, Jaarsma T. Perspectives of Health Care Providers on the Role of Culture in the Self-Care of Patients with Chronic Heart Failure: A Qualitative Interview Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(14):5051. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145051

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jönsson, Adam; Cewers, Emilie; Ben Gal, Tuvia; Weinstein, Jean M.; Strömberg, Anna; Jaarsma, Tiny. 2020. "Perspectives of Health Care Providers on the Role of Culture in the Self-Care of Patients with Chronic Heart Failure: A Qualitative Interview Study" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 14: 5051. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145051

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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