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Open AccessArticle

The Impact of Cybervictimization on Psychological Adjustment in Adolescence: Analyzing the Role of Emotional Intelligence

Department of Health Psychology, Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche, 03202 Elche, Spain
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3693; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103693
Received: 5 April 2020 / Revised: 14 May 2020 / Accepted: 20 May 2020 / Published: 23 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue School Climate, Bullying, and School Violence)
Cybervictimization has been associated with serious emotional adjustment problems such as low self-concept and depressive symptomatology. In addition, these problems can negatively affect the well-being of the victims, manifesting in their levels of satisfaction with life. However, it should be noted that not all cybervictims develop these consequences with the same intensity. These differences seem to be related to the development of emotional intelligence (EI), as it can positively influence adolescents’ emotional adjustment and well-being even when problems arise. The objective of this work was to analyze the role of EI on cybervictimization and adolescents’ emotional adjustment, especially in self-concept, depression, and life satisfaction. The participants in the study were 1318 adolescents of both sexes and aged between 11 and 18 years (M = 13.8, SD = 1.32), from four secondary compulsory education centers in Spain. EI influences the relationship between self-concept and life satisfaction, and between depression and life satisfaction. In addition, the relationships of cybervictimization with self-concept and depression are influenced when introducing EI and its dimensions (emotional attention, clarity, regulation). These data support the idea that EI may affect the relationship between cybervictimization and adolescents’ emotional adjustment. View Full-Text
Keywords: cybervictimization; self-concept; depression; life satisfaction; emotional intelligence cybervictimization; self-concept; depression; life satisfaction; emotional intelligence
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Estévez, J.F.; Cañas, E.; Estévez, E. The Impact of Cybervictimization on Psychological Adjustment in Adolescence: Analyzing the Role of Emotional Intelligence. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3693.

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