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Article

Using Life History Calendars to Estimate in Utero and Early Life Pesticide Exposure of Latinx Children in Farmworker Families

1
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA
2
Department of Family and Community Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA
3
Department of Anthropology, Lawrence University, Appleton, WI 54911, USA
4
Department of Biostatistics and Data Science, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA
5
Department of Radiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3478; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103478
Received: 22 March 2020 / Revised: 27 April 2020 / Accepted: 14 May 2020 / Published: 16 May 2020
(1) Background: Early life exposure to neurotoxic chemicals can have later impacts on child health. Most research designs must assume that current exposure is similar to past. Life history calendar methods can help to provide data on early life exposure. (2) Methods: Life history calendars were completed by mothers of 8-year-old children from Latinx farmworker and non-farmworker families (n = 73 and 65, respectively). Measures were created of months exposure through living adjacent to farm fields and having household members who worked in jobs exposing them to toxic chemicals. Data were divided into time periods of in utero, early childhood (birth-35 months) and later childhood (36–96 months). Cluster analysis compared the measures for children from farmworker and non-farmworker parents. (3) Results: Although, as a group, children from farmworker families have greater lifetime months of probable exposure to pesticides than children in non-farmworker families, cluster analysis reveals groups of children who do not follow that pattern. (4) Conclusions: The life history calendar is a technique for obtaining data on early life toxic chemical exposure that may help assign children to proper exposure groups. Conducting secondary analyses using such information can help to clarify the association of exposures to health outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: Latino/Hispanic; agricultural health; health disparities; migrant and seasonal farmworkers; exposure assessment Latino/Hispanic; agricultural health; health disparities; migrant and seasonal farmworkers; exposure assessment
MDPI and ACS Style

Quandt, S.A.; Mora, D.C.; Seering, T.L.; Chen, H.; Arcury, T.A.; Laurienti, P.J. Using Life History Calendars to Estimate in Utero and Early Life Pesticide Exposure of Latinx Children in Farmworker Families. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3478. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103478

AMA Style

Quandt SA, Mora DC, Seering TL, Chen H, Arcury TA, Laurienti PJ. Using Life History Calendars to Estimate in Utero and Early Life Pesticide Exposure of Latinx Children in Farmworker Families. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(10):3478. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103478

Chicago/Turabian Style

Quandt, Sara A., Dana C. Mora, Theresa L. Seering, Haiying Chen, Thomas A. Arcury, and Paul J. Laurienti 2020. "Using Life History Calendars to Estimate in Utero and Early Life Pesticide Exposure of Latinx Children in Farmworker Families" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 10: 3478. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103478

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