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Commentary

Re-Evaluating Expertise: Principles for Food and Nutrition Security Research, Advocacy and Solutions in High-Income Countries

1
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Queensland University of Technology; Brisbane 4059, Australia
2
Center for Children’s Health Research, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane 4101, Australia
3
Department of Health Management and Policy, Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(4), 561; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040561
Received: 7 December 2018 / Revised: 12 February 2019 / Accepted: 13 February 2019 / Published: 15 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addressing Food and Nutrition Security in Developed Countries)
Drawing on examples from Australia and the United States, we outline the benefits of sharing expertise to identify new approaches to food and nutrition security. While there are many challenges to sharing expertise such as discrimination, academic expectations, siloed thinking, and cultural differences, we identify principles and values that can help food insecurity researchers to improve solutions. These principles are critical consciousness, undoing white privilege, adopting a rights framework, and engaging in co-creation processes. These changes demand a commitment to the following values: acceptance of multiple knowledges, caring relationships, humility, empathy, reciprocity, trust, transparency, accountability, and courage. View Full-Text
Keywords: food and nutrition security; research; values; co-creation; trauma-informed food and nutrition security; research; values; co-creation; trauma-informed
MDPI and ACS Style

Gallegos, D.; Chilton, M.M. Re-Evaluating Expertise: Principles for Food and Nutrition Security Research, Advocacy and Solutions in High-Income Countries. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 561. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040561

AMA Style

Gallegos D, Chilton MM. Re-Evaluating Expertise: Principles for Food and Nutrition Security Research, Advocacy and Solutions in High-Income Countries. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(4):561. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040561

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gallegos, Danielle, and Mariana M. Chilton 2019. "Re-Evaluating Expertise: Principles for Food and Nutrition Security Research, Advocacy and Solutions in High-Income Countries" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 4: 561. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040561

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