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Open AccessArticle

Family Functioning, Emotional Intelligence, and Values: Analysis of the Relationship with Aggressive Behavior in Adolescents

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Department of Psychology, University of Almería, 04120 Almería, Spain
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Department of Psychology, Universidad Autónoma de Chile, Región Metropolitana, Providencia 7500000, Chile
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 478; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030478
Received: 22 December 2018 / Revised: 31 January 2019 / Accepted: 2 February 2019 / Published: 6 February 2019
Aggressive behavior in adolescence is influenced by a diversity of individual, family, and social variables. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between family functioning, emotional intelligence, and personal values for development with different types of aggression, as well as to establish profiles with these variables according to the aggression. The study was carried out with a sample of 317 high school students aged 13 to 18 years old. The study showed that stress management (emotional intelligence), positive adolescent development, and family functioning predominated in nonaggressive subjects with higher scores than aggressors did. There was also a negative relationship between the different types of aggression and emotional intelligence, positive values, and family functioning. In addition, two different profiles were found. The first profile had less family functioning, interpersonal emotional intelligence, stress management, and fewer personal and social values than the second profile. View Full-Text
Keywords: family functioning; aggressive behavior; emotional intelligence; adolescent values family functioning; aggressive behavior; emotional intelligence; adolescent values
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pérez-Fuentes, M.C.; Molero Jurado, M.M.; Barragán Martín, A.B.; Gázquez Linares, J.J. Family Functioning, Emotional Intelligence, and Values: Analysis of the Relationship with Aggressive Behavior in Adolescents. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 478.

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