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Open AccessArticle

Device-Measured Sedentary Behavior, Physical Activity and Aerobic Fitness Are Independent Correlates of Cognitive Performance in Healthy Middle-Aged Adults—Results from the SCAPIS Pilot Study

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The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, 11486 Stockholm, Sweden
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Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden
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Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 40530 Gothenburgh, Sweden
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Center for Health and Performance, Department of Food, Nutrition and Sports Science, 40530 Gothenburgh, Sweden
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Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Ostra, University of Gothenburg, 41345 Gothenburgh, Sweden
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Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, 40530 Gothenburgh, Sweden
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Department of Clinical Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, 41345 Gothenburgh, Sweden
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Department of Laboratory Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 41345 Gothenburg, Sweden
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Department of Clinical genetics and genomics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, 41345 Gothenburgh, Sweden
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The Memory Clinic, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, 40530 Gothenburgh, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 5136; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16245136
Received: 5 November 2019 / Revised: 11 December 2019 / Accepted: 12 December 2019 / Published: 16 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
High aerobic fitness, more moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and less sedentary behavior (SED) have all been suggested to promote cognitive functions, but it is unclear whether they are independent predictors of specific cognitive domains. This study aimed to investigate to what extent aerobic fitness MVPA and SED are independently associated with cognitive performance among middle-aged Swedish adults. We acquired device-based measures of aerobic fitness, cognitive performance and percent daily time spent in MVPA and SED in Swedish adults (n = 216; 54–66 years old). Aerobic fitness was associated with better performance at one out of two tests of speed/attention and one out of four tests of executive attention, and with worse performance at one of seven tests of memory. Increasing %MVPA was associated with better performance at one out of seven tests of memory and two out of three tests of verbal ability, whereas increasing %SED was associated with better performance at all four tests of executive attention and four out of seven tests of memory. These findings suggest that aerobic fitness, %MVPA and %SED are partly independent correlates of cognitive performance. To fully understand the association between SED and performance at several tests of cognitive function, future investigations might attempt to investigate intellectually engaging SED (such as reading books) separately from mentally undemanding SED (such as watching TV). View Full-Text
Keywords: cognitive functions; physical activity; sedentary behavior; exercise; accelerometry cognitive functions; physical activity; sedentary behavior; exercise; accelerometry
MDPI and ACS Style

Ekblom, M.M.; Ekblom, Ö.B.; Börjesson, M.; Bergström, G.; Jern, C.; Wallin, A. Device-Measured Sedentary Behavior, Physical Activity and Aerobic Fitness Are Independent Correlates of Cognitive Performance in Healthy Middle-Aged Adults—Results from the SCAPIS Pilot Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 5136.

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