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Open AccessArticle

Link to the Land and Mino-Pimatisiwin (Comprehensive Health) of Indigenous People Living in Urban Areas in Eastern Canada

1
Institut de recherche sur les forêts, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, 445 Boulevard de l'Université, Rouyn-Noranda, QC J9X 5E4, Canada
2
École d'études autochtones, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, 445 Boulevard de l'Université, Rouyn-Noranda, QC J9X 5E4, Canada
3
Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre Urbanisation Culture Société, 385 rue Sherbrooke Est, Montréal, QC H2X 1E3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4782; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234782
Received: 21 October 2019 / Revised: 27 November 2019 / Accepted: 27 November 2019 / Published: 28 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indigenous Health Wellbeing)
Mino-pimatisiwin is a comprehensive health philosophy shared by several Indigenous peoples in North America. As the link to the land is a key element of mino-pimatisiwin, our aim was to determine if Indigenous people living in urban areas can reach mino-pimatisiwin. We show that Indigenous people living in urban areas develop particular ways to maintain their link to the land, notably by embracing broader views of “land” (including urban areas) and “community” (including members of different Indigenous peoples). Access to the bush and relations with family and friends are necessary to fully experience mino-pimatisiwin. Culturally safe places are needed in urban areas, where knowledge and practices can be shared, contributing to identity safeguarding. There is a three-way equilibrium between bush, community, and city; and mobility between these places is key to maintaining the balance at the heart of mino-pimatisiwin. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aboriginal people; urban; place attachment; land; health Aboriginal people; urban; place attachment; land; health
MDPI and ACS Style

Landry, V.; Asselin, H.; Lévesque, C. Link to the Land and Mino-Pimatisiwin (Comprehensive Health) of Indigenous People Living in Urban Areas in Eastern Canada. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4782. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234782

AMA Style

Landry V, Asselin H, Lévesque C. Link to the Land and Mino-Pimatisiwin (Comprehensive Health) of Indigenous People Living in Urban Areas in Eastern Canada. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(23):4782. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234782

Chicago/Turabian Style

Landry, Véronique; Asselin, Hugo; Lévesque, Carole. 2019. "Link to the Land and Mino-Pimatisiwin (Comprehensive Health) of Indigenous People Living in Urban Areas in Eastern Canada" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 16, no. 23: 4782. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234782

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