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Open AccessArticle

Urban Air Pollution Particulates Suppress Human T-Cell Responses to Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

1
Physiology and Integrative Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA
2
Department of Microbiology, National Institute of Respiratory Diseases (INER), Mexico City 1408, Mexico
3
Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA
4
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Rutgers School of Public Health, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA
5
Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Mexico City 1408, Mexico
6
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 1C9, Canada
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Department of Biostatistics Rutgers University School of Public Health, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA
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Department of Urban-Global Public Health, Rutgers University School of Public Health, Newark, NJ 07102, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4112; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214112
Received: 26 September 2019 / Revised: 22 October 2019 / Accepted: 23 October 2019 / Published: 25 October 2019
Tuberculosis (TB) and air pollution both contribute significantly to the global burden of disease. Epidemiological studies show that exposure to household and urban air pollution increase the risk of new infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) and the development of TB in persons infected with M.tb and alter treatment outcomes. There is increasing evidence that particulate matter (PM) exposure weakens protective antimycobacterial host immunity. Mechanisms by which exposure to urban PM may adversely affect M.tb-specific human T cell functions have not been studied. We, therefore, explored the effects of urban air pollution PM2.5 (aerodynamic diameters ≤2.5µm) on M.tb-specific T cell functions in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). PM2.5 exposure decreased the capacity of PBMC to control the growth of M.tb and the M.tb-induced expression of CD69, an early surface activation marker expressed on CD3+ T cells. PM2.5 exposure also decreased the production of IFN-γ in CD3+, TNF-α in CD3+ and CD14+ M.tb-infected PBMC, and the M.tb-induced expression of T-box transcription factor TBX21 (T-bet). In contrast, PM2.5 exposure increased the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in CD3+ and CD14+ PBMC. Taken together, PM2.5 exposure of PBMC prior to infection with M.tb impairs critical antimycobacterial T cell immune functions. View Full-Text
Keywords: M.tb; PM2.5; immunity; proinflammatory cytokines; T-bet M.tb; PM2.5; immunity; proinflammatory cytokines; T-bet
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Ibironke, O.; Carranza, C.; Sarkar, S.; Torres, M.; Choi, H.T.; Nwoko, J.; Black, K.; Quintana-Belmares, R.; Osornio-Vargas, Á.; Ohman-Strickland, P.; Schwander, S. Urban Air Pollution Particulates Suppress Human T-Cell Responses to Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4112.

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