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Article

Emotional Intelligence Profiles of University Students with Motor Disabilities: Differential Analysis of Self-Concept Dimensions

1
Department of Communication and Social Psychology, University of Alicante, Alicante 03690, Spain
2
Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatment, University of Murcia, Murcia 30100, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4073; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214073
Received: 4 September 2019 / Revised: 12 October 2019 / Accepted: 21 October 2019 / Published: 23 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Health Care Sciences & Services)
Background: This study compares the self-concept of students that have motor disabilities with that of students in the normative group. It also considers whether there are EI (emotional intelligence) profiles based on combinations of EI components (attention, clarity, and mood repair). Finally, it analyzes whether there are statistically significant differences in self-concept based on the EI profiles found. Method: 102 university students with motor disabilities participated. The age range was 19–33 (M = 20.22, SD = 4.36). The Escala de Autoconcepto Forma 5 (Self-Concept Scale Form 5, AF5) and the Trait Meta-Mood Scale-24 (TMMS-24) were administered. Results: The scores for self-concept were lower in the sample of students with reduced mobility. The cluster analysis also identified three different EI profiles: one group of young people with high general EI scores, one group with high scores for clarity and mood repair, and a last group of students with low EI scores. Finally, the ANOVA showed better self-concept in the group with high scores in the three EI dimensions. The results suggest that better self-concept is associated with a high EI profile. Conclusions: It would be interesting to provide programs that consider EI in more depth to strengthen these students’ self-concept. View Full-Text
Keywords: emotional intelligence; self-concept; functional diversity; students; university emotional intelligence; self-concept; functional diversity; students; university
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MDPI and ACS Style

Suriá-Martínez, R.; Ortigosa Quiles, J.M.; Riquelme Marin, A. Emotional Intelligence Profiles of University Students with Motor Disabilities: Differential Analysis of Self-Concept Dimensions. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4073. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214073

AMA Style

Suriá-Martínez R, Ortigosa Quiles JM, Riquelme Marin A. Emotional Intelligence Profiles of University Students with Motor Disabilities: Differential Analysis of Self-Concept Dimensions. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(21):4073. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214073

Chicago/Turabian Style

Suriá-Martínez, Raquel, Juan M. Ortigosa Quiles, and Antonio Riquelme Marin. 2019. "Emotional Intelligence Profiles of University Students with Motor Disabilities: Differential Analysis of Self-Concept Dimensions" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 21: 4073. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214073

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