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Open AccessArticle

Persistent Hearing Loss among World Trade Center Health Registry Residents, Passersby and Area Workers, 2006–2007

1
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, World Trade Center Health Registry, New York City, NY 10013, USA
2
School of Medicine, New York University, New York, NY 10016, USA
3
Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL 33199, USA
4
Stephenson & Stephenson Research and Consulting, Loveland, OH 45140, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3864; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203864
Received: 6 September 2019 / Revised: 8 October 2019 / Accepted: 10 October 2019 / Published: 12 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
Background: Prior studies have found that rescue and recovery workers exposed to the 9/11 World Trade Center (WTC) disaster have evidence of increased persistent hearing and other ear-related problems. The potential association between WTC disaster exposures and post-9/11 persistent self-reported hearing problems or loss among non-rescue and recovery survivors has not been well studied. Methods: We used responses to the World Trade Center Health Registry (Registry) enrollment survey (2003–2004) and first follow-up survey (2006–2007) to model the association between exposure to the dust cloud and persistent hearing loss (n = 22,741). Results: The prevalence of post-9/11 persistent hearing loss among survivors was 2.2%. The adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of hearing loss for those who were in the dust cloud and unable to hear was 3.0 (95% CI: 2.2, 4.0). Survivors with persistent sinus problems, headaches, PTSD and chronic disease histories had an increased prevalence of reported hearing problems compared to those without symptoms or chronic problems. Conclusions: In a longitudinal study, we observed an association between WTC-related exposures and post-9/11 self-reported hearing loss among disaster survivors. View Full-Text
Keywords: World Trade Center disaster; hearing loss; dust World Trade Center disaster; hearing loss; dust
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Cone, J.E.; Stein, C.R.; Lee, D.J.; Flamme, G.A.; Brite, J. Persistent Hearing Loss among World Trade Center Health Registry Residents, Passersby and Area Workers, 2006–2007. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3864.

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