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Open AccessArticle

Disentangling Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Patterns in Children with Low Motor Competence

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School of Sport Studies, Fontys University of Applied Sciences, P.O. Box 347, 5600 AH Eindhoven, The Netherlands
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Department of Health Promotion, Nutrition and Translational Research Institute Maastricht (NUTRIM), Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
3
Department of Industrial Design, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3804; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203804
Received: 4 September 2019 / Revised: 4 October 2019 / Accepted: 6 October 2019 / Published: 10 October 2019
Children with low motor competence (MC) are at high-risk for physical inactivity, yet little is known about their physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) patterns throughout the day. The purpose of this study is to disentangle PA and SB patterns among children with low MC across segmented day periods taking into account differences in gender and age. Data collection took place between May and July 2017. The Athletic Skills Track was used to measure MC. PA levels were objectively measured using accelerometers (ActiGraph, GT3X+) on school days. Data were segmented for (1) time before school, (2) time during school (based on school schedules), and (3) time after school. In total, data from 117 7-to-11 years-old children with low MC were eligible for analyses (N = 58 girls; N = 59 boys). Differences in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and SB between segmented periods, gender, and grade were analyzed by ANOVAs with post hoc tests (Tukey) and Independent Sample T-tests respectively. Time spent at school is the major contributor of time spent in SB in children with low MC. Low MC is equally distributed among gender, but large differences exist among boys and girls in both MVPA and SB, indicating low-MC girls as most inactive group. This pattern is found in all segmented periods of the school day, i.e., before, during, and after school. This study stresses the negative contribution of current school curricula on PA and SB in children with low MC, indicating the most efficient period of the day to intervene. Future school-based PA and SB interventions should particularly focus on specific high-risk populations, i.e., children with low MC, and girls in particular. View Full-Text
Keywords: low motor competence; physical activity; sedentary behavior; primary schools; children low motor competence; physical activity; sedentary behavior; primary schools; children
MDPI and ACS Style

Van Kann, D.H.; Adank, A.M.; van Dijk, M.L.; Remmers, T.; Vos, S.B. Disentangling Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Patterns in Children with Low Motor Competence. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3804.

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