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A Systematic Review Protocol Investigating Community Gardening Impact Measures

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School of Health Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3122, Australia
2
School of Social Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3122, Australia
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School of Global, Urban and Social Studies, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000, Australia
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Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women, Queensland Government, Brisbane, Queensland 4000, Australia
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Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia
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Centre for Educational Research, Western Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales 2751, Australia
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Centre for Educational Research and Transitional Health Research Institutes, Western Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales 2751, Australia
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Botanic Gardens & Centennial Parklands, Sydney, New South Wales 2000, Australia
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Faculty of Science, School of Environment, University of Auckland, Auckland, North Island 1010, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(18), 3430; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183430
Received: 22 August 2019 / Revised: 11 September 2019 / Accepted: 12 September 2019 / Published: 16 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Investigating Urban Gardening as a Public Health Strategy)
Existing community gardening research has tended to be exploratory and descriptive, utilising qualitative or mixed methodologies to explore and understand community garden participation. While research on community gardening attracts growing interest, the empirical rigour of measurement scales and embedded indicators has received comparatively less attention. Despite the extensive body of community gardening literature, a coherent narrative on valid, high quality approaches to the measurement of outcomes and impact across different cultural contexts is lacking and yet to be comprehensively examined. This is essential as cities are becoming hubs for cultural diversity. Systematic literature reviews that explore the multiple benefits of community gardening and other urban agriculture activities have been undertaken, however, a systematic review of the impact measures of community gardening is yet to be completed. This search protocol aims to address the following questions: (1) How are the health, wellbeing, social and environmental outcomes and impacts of community gardening measured? (2) What cultural diversity considerations have existing community garden measures taken into account? Demographic data will be collected along with clear domains/constructs of experiences, impacts and outcomes captured from previous literature to explore if evidence considers culturally heterogeneous and diverse populations. This will offer an understanding as to whether community gardening research is appropriately measuring this cross-cultural activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: community garden; systematic review; protocol community garden; systematic review; protocol
MDPI and ACS Style

Kingsley, J.; Bailey, A.; Torabi, N.; Zardo, P.; Mavoa, S.; Gray, T.; Tracey, D.; Pettitt, P.; Zajac, N.; Foenander, E. A Systematic Review Protocol Investigating Community Gardening Impact Measures. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3430.

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