Next Article in Journal
Nonlinear and Spatial Effects of Tourism on Carbon Emissions in China: A Spatial Econometric Approach
Previous Article in Journal
Modeling Group Behavior to Study Innovation Diffusion Based on Cognition and Network: An Analysis for Garbage Classification System in Shanghai, China
Previous Article in Special Issue
Shifting from “Community-Placed” to “Community-Based” Research to Advance Health Equity: A Case Study of the Heatwaves, Housing, and Health: Increasing Climate Resiliency in Detroit (HHH) Partnership
Open AccessArticle

Collaborative Workshops for Community Meaning-Making and Data Analyses: How Focus Groups Strengthen Data by Enhancing Understanding and Promoting Use

1
Department of Science, Technology and Society, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 22043, USA
2
Centre Norbert Elias (UMR 85 62), Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales, 13236 Marseille, France
3
Department of Public and Nonprofit Administration, University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94117, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(18), 3352; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183352
Received: 16 August 2019 / Revised: 28 August 2019 / Accepted: 4 September 2019 / Published: 11 September 2019
Community-based participatory research is a growing approach, but often includes higher levels of community engagement in the research design and data collection stages than in the data interpretation stage. Involving study participants in this stage could further knowledge justice, science that aligns with and supports social justice agendas. This article reports on two community-based participatory environmental health surveys conducted between 2015 and 2019 in an industrial region near Marseille, France, and focuses specifically on our approach of organizing focus groups to directly involve residents and community stakeholders in the analysis and interpretation process. We found that, in these focus groups, residents triangulated across many different sources of information—study findings, local knowledge, and different types of expert knowledge—to reach conclusions about the health of their community and make recommendations for what should be done to improve community health outcomes. We conclude that involving residents in the data analysis and interpretation stage can promote epistemic justice and lead to final reports that are more useful to community stakeholders and decision-makers. View Full-Text
Keywords: community-based participatory research; data interpretation; environmental health; knowledge justice; public health; participatory science community-based participatory research; data interpretation; environmental health; knowledge justice; public health; participatory science
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Allen, B.L.; Lees, J.; Cohen, A.K.; Jeanjean, M. Collaborative Workshops for Community Meaning-Making and Data Analyses: How Focus Groups Strengthen Data by Enhancing Understanding and Promoting Use. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3352.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map

1
Back to TopTop