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Open AccessArticle

Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to Breaking Up Sitting Time among Desk-Based Office Workers: A Qualitative Investigation Using the TDF and COM-B

1
Institute for Health Research, University of Bedfordshire, Luton LU1 3JU, Bedfordshire, UK
2
Institute for Sport and Physical Activity Research, School of Sport Science and Physical Activity, University of Bedfordshire, Polhill Avenue, Bedford MK41 9EA, Bedfordshire, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 2903; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162903
Received: 21 July 2019 / Revised: 10 August 2019 / Accepted: 11 August 2019 / Published: 14 August 2019
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Abstract

High amounts of sedentary behaviour, such as sitting, can lead to adverse health consequences. Interventions to break up prolonged sitting in the workplace have used active workstations, although few studies have used behaviour change theory. This study aimed to combine the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) and the Capability, Opportunity, and Motivation to Behaviour system (COM-B) to investigate perceived barriers and facilitators to breaking up sitting in desk-based office workers. Semi-structured interviews with 25 desk-based employees investigated barriers and facilitators to breaking up sitting in the workplace. Seven core inductive themes were identified: ‘Knowledge-deficit sitting behaviour’, ‘Willingness to change’, ‘Tied to the desk’, ‘Organisational support and interpersonal influences’, ‘Competing motivations’, ‘Emotional influences’, and ‘Inadequate cognitive resources for action’. These themes were then deductively mapped to 11 of the 14 TDF domains and five of the six COM-B constructs. Participants believed that high amounts of sitting had adverse consequences but lacked knowledge regarding recommendations and were at times unmotivated to change. Physical and social opportunities were identified as key influences, including organisational support and height-adjustable desks. Future research should identify intervention functions, policy categories and behaviour change techniques to inform tailored interventions to change sitting behaviour of office workers. View Full-Text
Keywords: sedentary behaviour; barriers; facilitators; desk-based employees; office workers; COM-B; TDF; Behaviour Change Wheel sedentary behaviour; barriers; facilitators; desk-based employees; office workers; COM-B; TDF; Behaviour Change Wheel
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Ojo, S.O.; Bailey, D.P.; Hewson, D.J.; Chater, A.M. Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to Breaking Up Sitting Time among Desk-Based Office Workers: A Qualitative Investigation Using the TDF and COM-B. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2903.

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