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Psychosocial Risk Prevention in a Global Occupational Health Perspective. A Descriptive Analysis

1
Health Service Department, State Police, Ministry of Interior, Milan 20162, Italy
2
Post-graduate School of Occupational Medicine, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome 00168, Italy
3
Social and Health Systems Research Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki FI-00271, Finland
4
Health Services Research (HSR), CAPHRI, Maastricht University Medical Center, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht 6202 AZ, The Netherlands
5
Occupational Health Unit, Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, Rome 00165, Italy
6
Department of Woman/Child and Public Health, Fondazione Policlinico “A. Gemelli” IRCCS, Rome 00168, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(14), 2470; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16142470
Received: 30 May 2019 / Revised: 25 June 2019 / Accepted: 10 July 2019 / Published: 11 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Worker and Public Health and Safety: Current Views)
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PDF [328 KB, uploaded 11 July 2019]
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Abstract

This study aimed to find out which countries around the world require psychosocial hazards and workplace violence to be assessed by employers through a mandatory occupational risk assessment process and to compare the type of legislation between countries. We systematically searched the International Labour Office (ILO) “LEGOSH” database for documents published during the period between December 2017 and February 2018. The search included 132 countries, of which 23 were considered as developed and 109 as developing according to the United Nations. Our review showed that most countries (85, i.e., 64%) have not included mandatory psychosocial risk assessment and prevention in their national occupational safety and health legislation. Moreover, we found differences between developed and developing countries, showing that developed countries more frequently have legislative measures. Within developed countries, we also found differences between countries following the Scandinavian model of workplace health and safety culture and other countries. Moreover, in many countries, workplace violence was prohibited only if it involves an offence to moral or religious customs. In conclusion, the marked difference in psychosocial hazards and workplace violence regulations among countries leads to unequal levels of workers’ protection, with adverse effects on global health. View Full-Text
Keywords: global health; health inequalities; legislation; mental health; psychosocial hazard; public health policy; workplace violence; job strain; psychosocial hazard; occupational health global health; health inequalities; legislation; mental health; psychosocial hazard; public health policy; workplace violence; job strain; psychosocial hazard; occupational health
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Chirico, F.; Heponiemi, T.; Pavlova, M.; Zaffina, S.; Magnavita, N. Psychosocial Risk Prevention in a Global Occupational Health Perspective. A Descriptive Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2470.

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